Archdiocese of St. Louis

Catholic school grads average 24.8 on ACT test

College coursework here we come.

The ACT is the nation's most popular college entrance exam, accepted by all universities and colleges in the United States. It tests high school students' knowledge and provides personalized information about their strengths for education and career planning.

Data released from ACT on Sept. 7 show the average composite score for 2017 Catholic school graduates in the archdiocese was 24.8, an increase from the 2016 average score of 24.7. The Missouri state average is 20.4.

Twitter hashtag campaign, #lifeasapriest, shows priests to be regular guys

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Numerous archdiocesan priests have accounts on social media, whether on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or another digital outlet.

They detail events at their parishes and schools, share links of pertinent topics of the day or opine about such and offer inspirational words or the Word of God. Or they're just being plain silly with photobombs or quips.

Basically, they use social media similarly to everybody else.

News flash: priests put their pants on one leg at a time! (Same with their compatriots in consecrated life.)

Catholic education is a ministry, newbie teachers learn at orientation

Just weeks before the start of the school year, a crop of new Catholic school teachers assembled at the Cardinal Rigali Center for orientation into their new roles.

No doubt some of them were just as nervous as their students likely will be on the first day. Elementary schools in the archdiocese begin classes the week of Aug. 14, with most high schools starting around that time.

Mission in Bolivia busy in the works of the faith

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They do eat and sleep — somehow finding time.

The priests at the archdiocese's mission parish in an impoverished area of La Paz, Bolivia, pack in a full day of visiting people grieving after a loved one's death; blessing homes; walking the neighborhood and assisting homeless people; conducting marriage preparation classes and Marriage Encounter gatherings; celebrating Mass at the parish church and a dozen chapels; gathering with a youth group and senior citizens group; and much, much more.

'Special Assignments'

In the annual big shuffle of priestly appointments each June, most moves involve the comings and goings at parishes throughout the Archdiocese of St. Louis.

Newly ordained priests get their first assignments, associates become first-time pastors or parochial administrators and pastors move to new parishes, either as pastors or senior associates. Meanwhile, a few veteran priests call it a day, figuratively hanging up their collars for retirement.

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