Opinion

Below are the latest opinion pieces from the St. Louis Review. Click on a title or the 'Continue Reading' link to read the whole story.

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson spoke with Frank O'Brien of O'Brien Industrial Holdings, LLC, on the steps of the Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse.
May 25, 2017

History is repeating itself for Frank O'Brien.

Several years ago, the Catholic business owner filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, challenging a mandate that required most employers to purchase health insurance for their employees, including coverage for contraceptives, sterilizations and abortion-inducing drugs.

The suit eventually became the U.S. Supreme Court case in which Hobby Lobby chall...

May 25, 2017

May is traditionally a month when Catholics turn their attention toward Mary more intentionally. Marian processions and crownings in parishes and schools remind us of our childhood. I love processions!

I remember the school processions in May growing up in Colombia, South America, holding candles and singing hymns as we followed an image or a beautifully decorated statue of the Virgin Mary. Parents and neighbors joined along. By the way...

May 25, 2017

In his book "The Four Loves," C.S. Lewis wrote, "The typical expression of opening friendship would be something like, 'What? You too? I thought I was the only one.'"

This seems to be the reason that a good number of my friends are Catholic converts. I have spent the better part of my adult life trying to communicate the Church's teachings in various professions. The Gospel is good and always worth sharing.

Conversion requires a...

May 18, 2017

Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, Ill., wrote in a World Day of Peace reflection in 2015 about his hope that families, parishioners, neighbors and others will engage in fruitful conversations about encounters between white police officers and young men of color and about related issues.

"It would be particularly valuable if people of different racial backgrounds could partake in the same conversations," Bishop Braxton wrote. "Ther...

May 18, 2017

She was 19 years old. He was 23. She was in college and working in a restaurant. He had a good job with benefits. They were engaged to be married, the wedding scheduled in about 10 months, and had begun marriage preparation with a priest. Exciting times, to be sure.

But they were afraid something was wrong. She hadn't been feeling well for a few weeks and missed quite a few classes. He loved her deeply. Always a worrier, he had serious...

May 18, 2017

A while ago, I received a call from Chancellor Mark Wrighton, who told me the Board of Trustees of Washington University had unanimously awarded me an honorary doctorate. This was so surprising and off the page of anything even thought about that I was moved to the core and grateful beyond words.

The honorary degree is a sign of the huge impact the Church is having on the lives of all students of the university. The Catholic Student Cen...

May 11, 2017

Respect for life takes many forms, as shown in an article in the Review this week. Rose Gronemeyer, a special education teacher at Sacred Heart School in Florissant for nearly four decades, and several friends opened the Village of the Blue Rose in 2000 to provide a safe, nurturing environment for young adults with special needs — a place where after their education they could live, work and — most of all — grow in body, mind and spirit.

...
May 11, 2017

As Mother's Day approaches, fresh in my memory are recent encounters with two single mothers. First is my hairstylist who works two jobs, in the morning as an elementary school aide and then at the salon. Her polite greeting could not hide her apparent fatigue.

Another is a woman, recently widowed, with a third child about to enter college. The family finances had been drained by the long illness of her beloved husband. She felt utterly...

May 11, 2017

It's easy to become discouraged by local and world events. Almost every moment of our lives seems permeated by disappointment, senseless violence and tragic occurrences. Neighborhoods, cities and the world mirror the human brokenness and profound divisions that make it difficult for us to feel safe and hopeful.

Moreover, the challenges and difficulties that face our world and humanity are no longer kept at a distance. Traditional and co...

May 4, 2017

Auxiliary Bishop Mark Rivituso's strong work ethic and down-to-earth humor will make him an extraordinary shepherd for Catholic St. Louis 

Catholic St. Louis' new auxiliary bishop will certainly look to Christ the Good Shepherd for guidance as he begins his new life as a shepherd for the faithful here in the archdiocese.

Bishop Rivituso's May 2 ordination at the Cathedral...

May 4, 2017

Art Cullen may have his gripes about Catholicism, but he can't deny its influence on the work that last month won him a Pulitzer Prize.

The story went viral: Small-town newspaper editor beats out the likes of The Washington Post and the Houston Chronicle to earn journalism's highest honor. Score one for the little guy — in this case, The Storm Lake Times, a family-owned paper in Iowa with a 10-person staff and a circulation of 3,000....

May 4, 2017

Considered a true pioneer in sports medicine in St. Louis, Bill Hopfinger today is president of St. Louis Home Health, a Medicare-certified, orthopedic-only home health agency.

He formerly was head athletic trainer and physical therapist for St. Louis University and numerous professional soccer teams, including the original St. Louis Steamers. Hopfinger received the 2014 Alumni Merit Award from St. Louis University. He received a bachel...

April 27, 2017

The word of God is clear. We're to love our neighbors, including aliens, as we love ourselves. Knowing this simple truth and carrying it out in our personal lives — and as a matter of public policy — is a different matter.

We human beings are naturally suspicious and fearful of strangers. We know our own kind — for better or worse — and we can anticipate what family members, friends and neighbors and members of our own community or nati...

April 27, 2017

In the history of the modern American civil rights movement, three iconic moments are typically cited.

May 17, 1954: The U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, declaring segregated — "separate but equal" — public schools unconstitutional.

August 28, 1963: Two hundred thousand Americans participated in the March on Washington and heard Martin Luther King Jr., proclaim his dream of a c...

April 27, 2017

Social media platforms encourage young people to create and share content with their peers around the globe, which has amplified their voices and their potential to make a difference.

According to the International Telecommunication Union, an agency of the United Nations, information and communication technology has played a central role in young people's rise to prominence on a global scale.

"It has helped them to mobilize behin...

April 20, 2017

Ticket revenue, parking, concessions, souvenirs and naming rights ... these are terms associated with professional sports franchises.

Such revenue streams fund games that entertain us. Games and entertainment are ancillary aspects of life far beyond universal needs such food, clothing and roofs over our heads. In other words, foreign concepts to the poor and downtrodden, people striving to survive day-by-day.

Similar revenue stre...

April 20, 2017

The Jesuit Volunteer Corps was young — and so was I — when I arrived at a remote Alaskan village to teach school at a Jesuit boarding school for Native Alaskan students as a member of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps.

Cell phones and the Internet did not exist. In the village of St. Mary's, and in other villages on the far-flung Alaskan tundra, there was no television reception. A phone existed for the village — just one — and it was in a man...

April 20, 2017

On a pleasantly warm evening, 8-year-old Colin and I are hanging out in the front yard of his house. And my grandson gives me a spiritual lesson.

"Aw," says Colin, looking at their well-groomed lawn. "Where did all the dandelions go?" Immediately, I think: Dandelions are weeds. Weeds are bad. I wish my lawn didn't have so many of those dastardly weeds. But ... "I wanted to pick some of them," he says.

That's when I realize my per...