Year of Mercy

Stories for the Year of Mercy 2015-2016

Time of mercy: Holy doors close, but mission of mercy continues

A tapestry of St. Teresa of Kolkata was seen on the facade of St. Peter’s Basilica as Pope Francis celebrated her canonization Mass Sept. 4 at the Vatican. St. Teresa’s canonization was a highlight of the Year of Mercy.

VATICAN CITY — The Year of Mercy brought more than 20 million pilgrims to Rome, but for Pope Francis, the idea always was that the celebration of God's mercy would be local: Have people experience God's love in their parishes and send them out into the world to commit random acts of mercy.

Message of mercy continues in example of Christ the King

Pope Francis closed the Holy Door of St. Peter’s Basilica to mark the closing of the jubilee Year of Mercy at the Vatican Nov. 20.

VATICAN CITY — Following Christ the King, whose regal power is love and mercy, means the whole Church and each Christian must "follow his way of tangible love," Pope Francis said.

Celebrating the feast of Christ the King Nov. 20 and officially closing the extraordinary jubilee celebration of the Year of Mercy, Pope Francis declared, "we have received mercy in order to be merciful."

On a warm, late fall morning, St. Peter's Square was filled with an estimated 70,000 people for the Mass, which was concelebrated by the new cardinals Pope Francis had created the previous day.

Year of Mercy a success in eyes of local pilgrimage sites

Bishop Edward Rice opened the central doors of the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis to inaugurate a Year of Mercy as proclaimed by Pope Francis.

With the Year of Mercy ending Nov. 20, local pilgrimage sites reflected on how the year had an impact on Catholics in the Archdiocese of St. Louis.

Pope extends special Year of Mercy provisions on confession

Pope Francis signed an apostolic letter, "Misericordia et Misera," (Mercy and Misery) after celebrating the closing Mass of the jubilee Year of Mercy in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Nov. 20. In the letter the pope called for several special initiatives begun during the Year of Mercy to continue on a permanent basis.

VATICAN CITY -- Acknowledging and sharing God's mercy is a permanent part of the Christian life, so initiatives undertaken during the special Year of Mercy must continue, Pope Francis said.

"Mercy cannot become a mere parenthesis in the life of the Church," the pope wrote in an apostolic letter, "Misericordia et Misera," ("Mercy and Misery"), which he signed Nov. 20 at the end of the Year of Mercy. The Vatican released the text the next day.

YEAR OF MERCY | Mercy Fridays give pope a year of stories, tears, hugs

Pope Francis talked with residents on a visit May 13 at the “Chicco” Community in Ciampino, Italy, for his monthly Mercy Friday in the Jubilee Year of Mercy. The community was founded in 1981 and houses 18 people with intellectual challenges.

VATICAN CITY — Tears, prayers, caresses — but most of all, listening — were the hallmarks of Pope Francis' "Mercy Friday" visits during the Year of Mercy.

As the jubilee began last December, Pope Francis said he would ditch the media one Friday afternoon each month and personally try to give life to the corporal and spiritual works of mercy.

Throughout the year, he used his weekly general audiences and monthly Saturday jubilee audiences to teach about the reality of God's mercy and the obligation of sharing mercy with others.

‘Moved by Mercy’ is theme of Respect Life Month, yearlong observance

WASHINGTON — Each year, October is designated as Respect Life Month by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and the theme this year is "Moved by Mercy."

It draws on a quote from Pope Francis: "We are called to show mercy because mercy has been shown to us."

The first Sunday of October, which is Oct. 2 this year, is Respect Life Sunday, and kicks off a yearlong pro-life program for the U.S. Catholic Church.

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