Race Relations

Stories about race relations in St. Louis and the United States

Editorial | It’s time to get uncomfortable

Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, Ill., wrote in a World Day of Peace reflection in 2015 about his hope that families, parishioners, neighbors and others will engage in fruitful conversations about encounters between white police officers and young men of color and about related issues.

Raw emotions, continued dialog part of bridging racial divide

Listening as women expressed pain, anger and frustration in "Mother 2 Mother: A Conversation with Black Mothers" required a follow-up at several parishes that participated in the conversation at Mary Mother of the Church Parish in south St. Louis County.

Mother 2 Mother conversation opens up raw reality of race issues

Sitting in the sanctuary of Mary Mother of the Church, the women opened their hearts and let their pain, anger and frustration pour out.

The women were black. Their audience was largely white. As they shared their stories of raising their sons and having "the talk," it was apparent that two worlds had collided right there in church.

Marianist group at St. Mary’s tackles racial justice topic

The topic of racial justice is one that a group focused on Marian spirituality might have been inclined to skip.

But Mary led them to it, and the result is a Lenten program being held at St. Mary's High School on Wednesday evenings with a theme of "With Mary Toward Racial Justice." The weekly presentations on Marian spirituality and racial justice are open to the public.

Archbishop calls for bishops' racism statement given election tension

Atlanta Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory, center, and other prelates applauded Nov. 14 after an address by Archbishop Christophe Pierre, apostolic nuncio to the United States, during the annual fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore.

BALTIMORE -- Earlier this year, as communities faced tensions, protests and violence, following a spate of shooting and killings of black men by police, Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz, of Louisville, Ky., as president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, asked dioceses across the country to observe a day of prayer for peace.

He also wanted the bishops to look for ways they could help the suffering communities, as well as police affected by the incidents.

Exhibit portrays the real cost of unrelenting violence

"Sudarios" by Erika Diettes is a collection of portraits of women reliving "the moment that divided her life in two," alive but not living with grief from witnessing family embers who were victims of violence during unrest in Colombia.

The exhibition of 20 intimate portraits of women reliving a tragic period of their lives is moving — both figuratively and literally.

The photographs by Colombian artist Erika Diettes in "Sudarios" are of women who were forced to witness the torture and murder of their loved ones during Colombia's 50 years of civil conflict. The display is carefully designed to make the portraits come alive.

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