Pope's message

Stories from the (hopefully) weekly catholic perspectives piece that has to do with Pope Francis' weekly message.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Bible, like cellphone, should be carried always

Pope Francis attended the first day of his Lenten retreat at the Pauline Fathers’ retreat center in Ariccia, 20 miles southeast of Rome, March 5. The pope and top members of the Roman Curia were on retreat from March 5-10.

VATICAN CITY — Christians should care about reading God's messages in the Bible as much as they care about checking messages on their cellphones, Pope Francis said.

As Christ did in the desert when tempted by Satan, men and women can defend themselves from temptation with the word of God if they "read it often, meditate on it and assimilate it" into their lives, the pope said before praying the Angelus with those gathered in St. Peter's Square March 5.

POPE'S MESSAGE | Like expectant moms, live in joyful expectation of embracing God

Pope Francis embraced a man while meeting disabled people at his general audience Feb. 1 in Paul VI hall at the Vatican. The pope continued a series of talks on Christian hope, with a look at St. Paul’s First Letter to the Thessalonians (5:4-11) and what it teaches about the Christian belief in life after death.

VATICAN CITY — Christian hope isn't about believing in something that may or may not come true, like hoping tomorrow's weather will be pleasant, according to Pope Francis.

"Christian hope is the expectation of something that already has been fulfilled and that certainly will be attained for each one of us," that is, knowing Christ died and is truly risen so that all of humanity may gain salvation and live together with God, the pope told his weekly general audience Feb. 1.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Success, well-being at any cost will deceive, disappoint

Pope Francis arrived for a photo in the Sistine Chapel with the diplomatic corps accredited to the Holy See during the traditional exchange of new year’s greetings at the Vatican Jan. 9. The pope said that all religions are “called to promote peace.”

VATICAN CITY — Watch out for the tempting promises and easy rewards of false gods and idols because they always lead to confusion, disappointment and even death, Pope Francis said.

"We are tempted to seek even fleeting comfort, which seems to fill the emptiness of solitude and ease the exertion of believing" in God, especially in times of trouble, he said Jan. 11 at his weekly general audience.

But the hope and security that come from God "never ever disappoint," he said. "Idols always let you down" since they are figments of the imagination and not "alive and real" like God.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Admonish sin, but don't be a hypocrite

Pope Francis celebrated Mass Nov. 13 in St. Peter’s Basilica. Christians persevere in hope and love — no matter what upheavals and difficulties arise, he said in the homily

VATICAN CITY — Offering counsel and admonishing sinners are works of mercy, but they aren't a license to pretend to be better than others, Pope Francis said.

To counsel others is a chance to see how well you, too, measure up to essential standards, he said Nov. 16 to people gathered in St. Peter's Square.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Christians called to restore dignity to sick, imprisoned

Pope Francis arrived to lead his general audience Nov. 9 in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican. The pope’s catechesis focused on two works of mercy, visiting the sick and visiting the imprisoned.

VATICAN CITY — Visiting the sick and the imprisoned are works of mercy that not only benefit the suffering and the abandoned, but benefit the visitors who are enriched by being with those who suffer like Christ, Pope Francis said.

While the works of mercy are ancient, they still are relevant today for those who are deprived of freedom and "suffer one of the greatest hardships of human beings," the pope said Nov. 9 at his weekly general audience.

POPE’S MESSAGE | All Souls feast is a hopeful reminder of the resurrection

Pope Francis celebrated Mass in Rome’s Prima Porta cemetery Nov. 2, the feast of All Souls.

VATICAN CITY — Visiting a cemetery on the feast of All Souls can evoke feelings of loss and sadness, but for Christians marking the feast, it also is an affirmation of hope in the resurrection, Pope Francis said.

Through His death on the cross, Jesus "opened for us the door of hope where we will contemplate God," the pope said Nov. 2 at an evening Mass amid the tombs of Rome's Prima Porta cemetery.

"The hope of the resurrection never fails us," the pope said. "The first one who walked this path was Jesus. We will walk the path He has walked."

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