Pope's message

Stories from the (hopefully) weekly catholic perspectives piece that has to do with Pope Francis' weekly message.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Fasting during Lent includes sharing, treating others kindly

Pope Francis heard confession at his annual Lenten meeting with the pastors of Rome parishes Feb. 15 at the Basilica of St. John Lateran. The meeting included prayer, confessions and a question-and-answer session with the pope.

VATICAN CITY — Loudly boasting or complaining about fasting during Lent and treating others unkindly isn't what God wants, Pope Francis said.

"Does my fasting end up helping others? If it doesn't, it's fake, it's contradictory and it leads to the path of a double life. I pretend to be Christian — righteous like the Pharisees, the Sadducees — but inside I am not," he said in the homily Feb. 16 at morning Mass in the Domus Sanctae Marthae.

POPE’S MESSAGE | People have right to receive God’s word, so preach it well

Pope Francis greeted the crowd during his general audience Feb. 14 in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican.

VATICAN CITY — Everyone who attends Mass has the right to hear the word of God in all its fullness, which means it must be read and explained with "fervor," Pope Francis said at his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square Feb. 14.

The pope continued his series of audience talks on the Mass, underlining the importance of receiving "abundantly from the treasury of God's word" present in the Mass readings and the homily.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Homilies must help people reflect, not nap

Pope Francis talked to the congregation with Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan at a private meeting Feb. 5 at the Vatican. The talk included discussion on the status of Jerusalem and the need to achieve peace in the Middle East through dialogue and respect for human rights.

VATICAN CITY — Catholic priests must deliver good homilies so the "good news" of the Gospel can take root in people's hearts and help them live holier lives, Pope Francis said.

But the faithful in the pews need to do their part, too, the pope said at his weekly general audience Feb. 7.

Catholics need to read the Bible more regularly so they can better understand the Mass readings, and they need to be patient with the homilist, especially if the sermon is boring, meandering or hard to understand.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Readings at Mass offer God’s ‘real-time’ help

Pope Francis and Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk of Kiev-Halych, head of the Ukrainian Catholic Church, released doves at the end of the pope’s meeting with the Ukrainian Catholic community Jan. 28 at the Basilica of Santa Sophia in Rome. The pope offered a reflection on the theme of a multiyear renewal effort in Ukrainian Catholic parishes around the world.

VATICAN CITY — Listening to the Scripture readings at Mass is hearing God speak directly to His people, offering spiritual sustenance and needed guidance for life's difficult journey, Pope Francis said.

For that reason, the prescribed texts should never be skipped or substituted at Mass, lectors should read clearly and people should always listen with an open heart so that the words may eventually bear fruit in good deeds, the pope said at his weekly general audience Jan. 31.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Don’t compromise on protecting minors from abuse

Pope Francis greeted a 99-year-old blind woman Jan. 20 along the parade route in Trujillo, Peru.

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis said he told the bishops and priests of Chile to be uncompromising when it comes to protecting minors from sexual abuse and to trust that God will purify and renew His Church during this time of trial.

Problems and conflicts must never be swept under the rug, he also said, because they can be resolved only through openness and dialogue.

At his weekly general audience Jan. 24 in St. Peter's Square, the pope told an estimated 15,000 pilgrims and visitors about his Jan. 15-21 visit to Chile and Peru.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Pray with courage, conviction, not mindlessly like a parrot

Pope Francis burned incense as he celebrated Mass marking the World Day of Migrants and Refugees Jan. 14 in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican. See story, page 26.

VATICAN CITY — Prayer is a "high stakes" endeavor, requiring courage, perseverance and patience, Pope Francis said.

Courage is needed to stick one's neck out and "challenge the Lord," pursuing and confronting Him with one's appeals, the pope said Jan. 12 in the homily at Mass in the Domus Sanctae Marthae.

"If prayer isn't courageous, it isn't Christian," he said.

Syndicate content