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Marian Middle School spotlights vocations stories

Sister Sarah Heger, CSJ, vice principal and fifth-grade teacher at Marian Middle School in south St. Louis, taught a religion class on the Acts of the Apostles.

Working in collaboration, sisters from eight religious communities wanted to form an all-girls counterpart to Loyola Academy, an all-boys Jesuit middle school a few blocks from St. Louis University.

The resulting Marian Middle School celebrates its 15th anniversary with an open house from 3-6 p.m. Tuesday, May 5, at the school in the former Holy Family School at 4130 Wyoming St.

The open house offers a chance not only for neighbors to check out the school, but also for students to mingle with the sisters and learn about the school's founding communities.

Pain doesn't stop student from touting education support

Cardinal Ritter High School senior Cameron Caldwell, right, attends the school through the help of the Today and Tomorrow Foundation. He talked with Rayne Clark in the hallway on his way to British literature class studying a sonnet by William Shakespeare.

Cameron Caldwell considered it a great honor to be picked as the student to address about 600 people at the Archbishop's Gala benefiting the Today and Tomorrow Educational Foundation in late April.

The senior at Cardinal Ritter College Preparatory High School planned to tell the crowd how much students accomplish thanks to their generous support, which makes all of the difference to students such as himself. He was primed and ready for the festivities that evening in the Khorassan Ballroom at the Chase Park Plaza.

First St. Louis Mass Mob evokes memories, pride for north St. Louis church

Mass Mob at Most Holy Trinity Church.

Pat DeWitt often played in the priests' garage at Most Holy Trinity Church in north St. Louis.

"They had this big old garage," DeWitt recalled. "A lot of times nobody would be there, so my girlfriends and I would set up our doll stuff inside. Father Schoen was the pastor when I was here. If he'd come home when we had all our stuff set up out there, he'd just go park on the street."

Funding gap forces changes in center's 'lifeline' services

Lisa Johnston | lisajohnston@archstl.org | twitter: @aeternusphoto

Araceli Domenden held a warm meal that Roger Dickson just delivered as part of a meals program from the Father Tolton Center, which provides a place for elderly to gather, share company and a meal. The center is on the campus of Our Lady of the Holy Cross in Baden and is a ministry of St. Francis Community Services.

Araceli Domenden was waiting at her front door for Roger Dickson.

He handed her a warm meal, as he does five days a week for the home-delivered meal program at Catholic Charities' Father Tolton Center.

"Thank you so much for the food -- thank you, thank you, thank you," she said. "Believe me, it helps."

St. Patrick Center links clients with employers

Jerrod Booth spoke with Allison Whittaker, a human resources specialist from the United States Postal Service, at a job fair hosted by St. Patrick Center for its clients.

Jerrod Booth quietly approached the United States Postal Service table at the employment fair, tightly clutching a well-worn orange folder stuffed with papers. He struggled to hold his head up and make eye contact, clearly uncomfortable at the moment.

Allison Whittaker looked up from the table, smiled and greeted him. She then stood up and shook his hand.

A human resources specialist, Whittaker immediately let Booth know that the Postal Service is hiring, and Booth took a deep breath, settling his nerves down.

Exchange program opens students to culture of Japanese 'sisters'

Twelve students from Notre Dame School in Kyoto visited their sister school in St. Louis, Notre Dame High School. Using Japanese calligraphy, Rie Kitamura and Rie Oshnishi wrote Esmeralda Hernandez’s name, which in Japanese, translates as “blessing.”

At Notre Dame High School last week, the normal chatter of teenage girls was replaced with a lot of smiling and giggling between students and their visitors from Japan.

Twelve junior- and senior-high students from Notre Dame School in Kyoto were visiting as part of an annual cultural exchange between the sister schools. The Kyoto school was founded by American School Sisters of Notre Dame in 1952 to help rebuild the community after World War II.

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