Youth

Has God Pikachu? Popularity of Pokemon Go opens door for church evangelization

Father Thomas Keller, pastor of Assumption Parish in St. Louis visited with Pokemon game players in the church parking lot.  The Parish grounds are a hot spot for the game, and so he and his associate pastor, Father David Miloscia have used the Pokemon craze for some creative evangelization. The high school friends are Alex Koelz, Adam Salman, Blake Koelz, Alec Richardson and Brennan Moore.

The messages are posted across campus at Assumption Church in south St. Louis County:

Attention Pokemon trainers: Feeling alone? God already Pikachu!

Looking for Pokemon? Maybe God is looking for you!

Playing with cheat codes? We've got a sacrament that can fix that!

GO SLOWPOKE! CHILDREN AT PLAY

U.S. pilgrims to World Youth Day reflect new Church demographics

People watch on large screens as Pope Francis celebrates Mass in Philadelphia Sept. 26. World Youth Day organizers say the changing demographics of the church in the United States will be reflected in the pilgrims to World Youth Day in Krakow.

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — As the Church in the U.S. has shown an increasing presence of Spanish-speaking Catholics, so will the tens of thousands of young people traveling to 2016 edition of World Youth Day in Krakow, Poland.

"There are more groups coming from heavily Hispanic/Latino dioceses, and in a particular way from apostolic movements like Charismatic Renewal, Focolare, and others," said Paul Jarzembowski, World Youth Day USA national coordinator for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

St. Pius community comes together after cadet’s death

A tragic accident in which an Army cadet from St. Louis died after rescuing a drowning swimmer off a Long Island beach brought a grieving community together and led to the founding of a scholarship in his name.

SteubySTL will draw teens closer to Christ

Jacob Pappas, middle left, and his youth group from Cape Girardeau, Missouri, enjoyed the rock out session that was led by worship leader Adam Bitter. Bitter played covers from the band Walk the Moon and solo artist George Ezra at the Stuebenville St. Louis Mid-America held at JQH Arena in Springfield, Mo.,in 2015.

Seventeen years ago, the Steubenville youth conference was humbly born in a gymnasium at Marquette High School in west St. Louis County. The first conference, which drew 987 participants, was less than six months after Pope John Paul II's pastoral visit to St. Louis.

The teens quickly outgrew the space. The following year, it moved to St. Louis University High School — but interest was spreading across the Midwest. In 2002, the conference found its home at Missouri State University in Springfield, Mo., where it's been held every summer ever since.

Schoolchildren enliven prayer service at Nazareth Living Center

Sophia Sutton talked to Jeannette Faulkenberry before giving her a heart that read “God Loves You.” Nazareth Living Center’s celebration of the World Day of Prayer featured a prayer service with residents and their near-by neighbors, kindergarten students at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque.

Kindergartners lined up neatly in front of the Nazareth Living Center chapel. A few boys struggled to stand still. One girl resisted sucking on her finger. They were nervous and uncomfortable, but all were quiet until it came time to sing.

They had the words and melody just right as they sang "Let the Little Children Come to Me."

The song was appropriate for the occasion, Nazareth's celebration of the 2016 World Day of Prayer — with a theme of "Let the Little Children Come to Me."

Pastors, scout leaders begin to assess future of Girl Scouts

Two weeks since Archbishop Robert J. Carlson issued a letter expressing concerns about Girl Scouts, pastors and scout leaders have begun to discuss the future of scouting in parishes.

The Feb. 18 letter was the latest in a years-long series of communications with Catholics in the archdiocese about concerns with the values and policies of Girl Scouts USA, which Archbishop Carlson has said are "becoming increasingly incompatible with our Catholic values."

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