Youth

Catholic high school students work to end bullying ‘Piece-by-Peace’

This is the graphic design of an award-winning board game called “Piece-by-Peace” created by three seniors at Mater Dei High School in Evansville, Ind. Each of the colors represents either a form of bullying, facts about bullying or information about combating bullying.

EVANSVILLE, Ind. — Austin Bowen, Noah Harrison and Michaela Kunkler, seniors at Mater Dei High School in Evansville, have ideas about how to combat bullying. Those ideas have helped them each land a full scholarship to the University of Evansville.

The trio recently won the university's High School Changemaker Challenge; the grand prize is a full scholarship to the university for each member of the winning team.

Midshipman answers the call at Kenrick-Glennon

While attending the U.S. Naval Academy last year, current seminarian Andrew Hunt, left, realized that the call to the priesthood was stronger than his desire to stay at the Academy. He credits the Catholic community at the Naval Academy with encouraging his discernment.

With an appointment to the United States Naval Academy, Andrew Hunt seemed to have his plans set for at least the next nine years, maybe more.

He'd spend four years at the academy in Annapolis, Md., then five more as a commissioned officer in the Navy. After that, he'd either become career military, just as his father, John, was for 34 years in the Air Force, or parlay his Naval experience into a rewarding career.

Either way, it seemed that he would fulfill the dreams nurtured by tagging along as a young child with his dad to Scott Air Force Base in Mascoutah, Ill.

Generation Life teens proclaim the Gospel of Life at March for Life

Teens on the Generation Life pilgrimage shared their excitement at the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C. About 2,100 teens and others attended the annual pilgrimage, sponsored by the Catholic Youth Apostolate.

As the crowd swelled and the chants rose, Jill Stinehart was feeling energized as the March for Life in Washington, D.C., commenced.

"I believe — we love life," chanted the teens with the Archdiocese of St. Louis' Generation Life pilgrimage filled the streets.

Never-give-up attitude prevails at Most Holy Trinity Academy

De Smet Jesuit High School sophomore Cameron Rodgers played one-on-one basketball with Most Holy Trinity eighth-grader Davion Ford. Cameron is part of the “Give Back” work- study program at Access Academies, in which graduates of the academies who are in high school or college return to provide assistance and mentoring to current students.

Cameron Rodgers is comfortable at De Smet Jesuit High School in Creve Coeur, where the sophomore excels in the classroom and on the football field and track.

That comfort level is matched or exceeded at Most Holy Trinity Academy in north St. Louis, where he serves as a tutor and assistant basketball coach. He's an effective leader, assisting the grade-schoolers with their studies and athletic skills.

‘Make your voice heard’ | Pope Francis says 2018 Synod of Bishops focused on youth needs young people’s input

Pope Francis waved as he arrived for a welcoming ceremony at the 2016 World Youth Day at Blonia Park in Krakow, Poland. As the Catholic Church prepares for a meeting of the Synod of Bishops focused on youth, the pope wrote a letter to young people saying the Church wants “to listen to your voice, your sensitivities and your faith, even your doubts and your criticism.”

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis asked young people to tell him, their bishops and pastors about their hopes and struggles and even their criticisms.

In preparation for a meeting of the Synod of Bishops focused on youth, the pope wrote a letter to young people, saying the Church wants "to listen to your voice, your sensitivities and your faith, even your doubts and your criticism."

"Make your voice heard," the pope told young people. "Let it resonate in communities and let it be heard by your shepherds of souls."

Balance of solidarity, subsidiarity guide future of Catholic schools

The proposal of three school models in the Archdiocese of St. Louis signals a major shift in the way the Catholic Education Office operates and how they're looking at the future of Catholic education in St. Louis.  Students at Blessed Teresa of Calcutta will be an Archdiocesan School model. Makalo Spencer seemed to raise his hand for every question about subjective personal pronouns during his sixth grade language arts lesson.

Kurt Nelson sees the future of Catholic education in the archdiocese as that of balancing a set of scales. On one side you have subsidiarity — the principle of making decisions at the most local level possible. On the other, you've got solidarity — Catholics throughout the archdiocese acting together as one Body in Christ.

"We want people to do the things they need to do, to have those freedoms," the superintendent of Catholic education said. "And where they have challenges, we want the solidarity piece to show how we are working as a larger Church. It's a balancing of both of these."

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