youth

Go To Bat for Kids provides unforgettable memories for kids

Carlos Williams threw out the first pitch at the St. Louis Cardinals’ game on April 20. Carlos had been selected through Catholic Charities of St. Louis’ Go to Bat for Kids campaign.

With three curved fingers hooked on top, and a thumb positioned underneath, Carlos Williams demonstrated how he held the baseball for his first-ever major-league pitch.

The 7-year-old threw the first pitch at the St. Louis Cardinals game April 20 as part of Catholic Charities of St. Louis' Go to Bat for Kids campaign.

Later, Carlos showed off his newly prized possession, the ball signed by Cardinals pitcher Matt Bowman.

"That's how he told me to throw it," Carlos said of his expert advice. "And I was the only one that got to throw that ball."

Axe-throwing, beer-drinking evangelization

Franciscan Brother Andrew Hennessy puffed from a cigar while promoting The Man Tour before a March 10 event in Mount St. Francis, Ind. The event included smoking cigars, throwing axes and participating in eucharistic adoration. “We want to bring men together to see where they are in their walk in life, and where they are in their relationship with Christ and the Church so we can better prescribe a men’s ministry,” said Philip Wiese, director of youth ministries for the New Albany Deanery.

INDIANAPOLIS — While talking about The Man Tour, Conventual Franciscan Brother Andrew Hennessy shares his purpose for creating an evening that combines throwing axes, drinking beer, eating pizza, smoking cigars and participating in eucharistic adoration.

The 28-year-old friar, who's involved in young adult ministry, wants The Man Tour to deepen the bonds of young men who already share the Catholic faith while also connecting with young men who don't have a home in the Church.

Totus Tuus catechetical program is growing in archdiocese

Totus Tuus, a catechetical summer program for first- through 12th-graders, is growing in the Archdiocese of St. Louis.

The program, which expanded from seven parishes last year to 11 this summer, has elements of a vacation Bible school and a mission. Taught by young adult catechists, known as "missionary teachers," participants learn what it means to share the Gospel and how to promote the faith through evangelization, catechesis, Christian witness and eucharistic worship.

Holy Cross students get a glimpse of religious life

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Rachel Schaefer had a simple question after Sister Maryellen Tierney, CSJ, shared her vocation story.

"How did you know?" the Holy Cross Academy seventh-grader asked.

"That's a good question; how does anyone know?" said Sister Maryellen, who attended Catholic grade schools and Rosati-Kain High School before entering the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet in 1957. A depiction of Jesus Christ's crucifixion resonated with her.

Filling bellies and minds

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Kim Davis came home one day last spring to find three neighborhood kids sitting on the front steps of her home in the Ville neighborhood of north St. Louis.

She didn't know them. They got up to scatter, and she told them, "You don't have to go anywhere." After a few minutes of conversation, the youngest asked for a nickel. The kids didn't have much food in the house, and they wanted something to eat. An older sibling chimed in, and asked if there was anything they could do to earn a little bit of money.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Bangladesh, Myanmar youths are a sign of hope for Asia

Pope Francis waved during his Angelus address in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican Dec. 3. Advent is a time to be watchful and alert to the ways one strays from God’s path, but also to signs of His presence in other people and in the beauty of the world, Pope Francis said.

VATICAN CITY — Young people in Myanmar and Bangladesh are a source of hope for a peaceful future in their countries after years of war and suffering, Pope Francis said.

As is customary, at his general audience Dec. 6, the first after his Nov. 27-Dec. 2 trip to Asia, Pope Francis reviewed his visit.

"In the faces of those young people, full of joy, I saw the future of Asia: A future that doesn't belong to those who build weapons, but to those who sow brotherhood," the pope said.

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