Youth

Lwanga honoree: Youth ministry is about taking the ‘ink off paper and making it walk’

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Corliss Cox knows what it's like to do youth ministry with no money and no plan — and nothing but an intense trust in God and the ability to step out in faith.

Those were the early days of youth ministry for Cox, who was invited to work with the Ujima Youth Program, which became part of the Catholic Youth Council in the mid-1980s to address the needs of black Catholic teens. Several years prior, she had left a job in corporate America to stay home with her newborn son; by the time he turned three, she was looking to return to work.

COMING OF AGE | Technology and social media empower youth

Social media platforms encourage young people to create and share content with their peers around the globe, which has amplified their voices and their potential to make a difference.

According to the International Telecommunication Union, an agency of the United Nations, information and communication technology has played a central role in young people's rise to prominence on a global scale.

"It has helped them to mobilize behind a common cause and to collaborate, and it has given them a voice where before they had none," the agency stated in the report from 2013.

The rewards of mentoring

Bishop DuBourg High School students Fabian Sanchez, left, and Zion Reece, right, moved their team robot for a match at the FIRST Robotics Competition St. Louis Regional. DuBourg robotics club member Jacob Lucas is at the back, left.

Team mentor Marybeth Krull couldn't contain her enthusiasm on the floor at Chaifetz Arena after Bishop DuBourg's match in the FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC, for short) St. Louis Regional.

"Yeah, that's it!" she said as she high-fived Zion Reece.

"Awesome!" she congratulated Fabian Sanchez.

She repeated the exhortation to Jonathan Williams, then used it often after the trio fetched their robot from the battle arena and carted it back to Bishop DuBourg's pit area.

"This is my first time here," confided the DuBourg learning consultant, so, of course, everything was awesome.

Catholic high school students work to end bullying ‘Piece-by-Peace’

This is the graphic design of an award-winning board game called “Piece-by-Peace” created by three seniors at Mater Dei High School in Evansville, Ind. Each of the colors represents either a form of bullying, facts about bullying or information about combating bullying.

EVANSVILLE, Ind. — Austin Bowen, Noah Harrison and Michaela Kunkler, seniors at Mater Dei High School in Evansville, have ideas about how to combat bullying. Those ideas have helped them each land a full scholarship to the University of Evansville.

The trio recently won the university's High School Changemaker Challenge; the grand prize is a full scholarship to the university for each member of the winning team.

Midshipman answers the call at Kenrick-Glennon

While attending the U.S. Naval Academy last year, current seminarian Andrew Hunt, left, realized that the call to the priesthood was stronger than his desire to stay at the Academy. He credits the Catholic community at the Naval Academy with encouraging his discernment.

With an appointment to the United States Naval Academy, Andrew Hunt seemed to have his plans set for at least the next nine years, maybe more.

He'd spend four years at the academy in Annapolis, Md., then five more as a commissioned officer in the Navy. After that, he'd either become career military, just as his father, John, was for 34 years in the Air Force, or parlay his Naval experience into a rewarding career.

Either way, it seemed that he would fulfill the dreams nurtured by tagging along as a young child with his dad to Scott Air Force Base in Mascoutah, Ill.

Generation Life teens proclaim the Gospel of Life at March for Life

Teens on the Generation Life pilgrimage shared their excitement at the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C. About 2,100 teens and others attended the annual pilgrimage, sponsored by the Catholic Youth Apostolate.

As the crowd swelled and the chants rose, Jill Stinehart was feeling energized as the March for Life in Washington, D.C., commenced.

"I believe — we love life," chanted the teens with the Archdiocese of St. Louis' Generation Life pilgrimage filled the streets.

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