world meeting of families

Papa Palooza is like “an old-fashioned family picnic”

The excitement around the upcoming World Meeting of Families in August won't just be limited to crowds in Dublin, Ireland. On Saturday, July 28, the archdiocesan Office of Laity and Family Life will bring the festivities to St. Louis, hosting the second-ever "Papa Palooza."

"I think the greatest part about it is the fact that it brings families together," said Julie Bostick, executive director of the Office of Laity and Family Life.

The first Papa Palooza, in 2015, celebrated Pope Francis' visit to the U.S. for the world meeting in Philadelphia that year.

POPE'S MESSAGE | The family is the answer to world's brokenness, blandness

Pope Francis visited St. Patrick Church in the City in Washington, D.C., and met with the poor who have received help from Catholic Charities in the Archdiocese of Washington, D.C.

VATICAN CITY -- The family is the answer to the two extremes facing the world -- fragmentation and "homogenization," in which everything is forced to be the same, Pope Francis said.

The family based on marriage between a man and a woman is the answer because "it is the cell of a society that balances the personal and communal," he said at his general audience Sept. 30 in St. Peter's Square.

The family also can be "the model of a sustainable management of goods and the resources of creation" against today's culture of consumerism, he added.

Dublin to host next World Meeting of Families in 2018

Pope Francis greeted Dublin Archbishop Diarmuid Martin at the closing Mass of the World Meeting of Families on Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia Sept. 27. The 2018 World Meeting of Families is to be held in Dublin.

PHILADELPHIA -- Irish pilgrims in Philadelphia shared their excitement after Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia, president of the Pontifical Council for the Family, announced the 2018 World Meeting of Families would be held in Dublin.

Irish pilgrim Mary Fitzgibbon's reaction was raw when she spoke with Catholic News Service. She had traveled to Philadelphia with her husband, Michael, and five children, ages 2-14, but had missed Archbishop Paglia's announcement Sept. 27.

At World Meeting of Families, pope tells families to serve, care for each other

Pope Francis prayed the Kyrie at the Mass to close the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia.

PHILADELPHIA -- Pope Francis urged the hundreds of thousands of people gathered for the closing Mass of the World Meeting of Families to serve and care for each other as freely as God loves the human family.

The pope called upon the faithful to embrace signs that the Holy Spirit can work through everyone. He referred to the readings in the multilingual Mass -- from the Book of Numbers and the Gospel of Mark -- in which members of the faith community questioned the work of those not part of their group and for prophesying in the name of God.

St. Louisians reflect on 'inspiring trip'

Pilgrims from the Archdiocese of St. Louis attended the closing Mass of the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia on a pilgrimage with the archdiocesan Office of Laity and Family Life. Thousands of people attended the Mass.

Being with families from across the globe at the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia was a thrill for the pilgrims from the Archdiocese of St. Louis.

Julie Bostick, executive director of the archdiocese's Office of Laity and Family Life, said the diverse group "came together as one Catholic family, worshiping and having a good time together."

Bostick was among those who were mesmerized by Pope Francis' talk about the challenges and love that come with being part of a family. His "beautiful, off-the-cuff talk" Sept. 26 "brought tears to my eyes," Bostick said.

Memory and motion: Pope Francis shows Americans who he really is

Pope Francis waved to the crowd as he arrived to celebrate the closing Mass for the World Meeting of Families.

PHILADELPHIA -- Pope Francis speaks often about memory and motion, the importance of remembering where you came from and setting off without fear to share the Gospel.

That's what he did in the United States. He circled the Statue of Liberty in a helicopter and flew over Ellis Island not preparing to condemn the world's great superpower, but to reflect on its history and promise as a land that welcomes people, makes them part of the family and allows them to thrive.

Syndicate content