Women religious

Incarnate Word Sisters of Houston establish international novitiate in St. Louis

Sister Ita Harnett, postulant director for the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word novitiate in St. Louis, looked at the colors coming off the stained glass with formation director Sister Helena Adaku Ogbuji. The Sisters of Charity recently completed consolidation of novitiates from Kenya and Guatemala into the novitiate in St. Louis.

The Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word of Houston have established a new home for their international novitiate, right in the heart of the old Gaslight Square district of St. Louis.

Work was completed in December on the two-story, 3,300-square-foot facility at the intersection of Olive and Boyle streets in the Central West End. A blessing of the house was to have taken place Feb. 18.

Holy Cross students get a glimpse of religious life

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Rachel Schaefer had a simple question after Sister Maryellen Tierney, CSJ, shared her vocation story.

"How did you know?" the Holy Cross Academy seventh-grader asked.

"That's a good question; how does anyone know?" said Sister Maryellen, who attended Catholic grade schools and Rosati-Kain High School before entering the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet in 1957. A depiction of Jesus Christ's crucifixion resonated with her.

Incarnate Word Sisters to establish space in St. Louis City for novitiate, community living

A former banquet hall will become a new space for the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word, a home for the community's novitiate and a place to promote intergenerational and intercultural living.

The sisters, based in San Antonio, purchased the 5,600-square-foot building in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of south St. Louis earlier this spring. Sisters Cathy Vetter and Helena Monahan, along with a novice, Miriam Bannon, will be the first residents. The house is undergoing renovations and is expected to be completed by spring.

Sister Antona Ebo feted as example of living the Gospel message

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Come. Listen. Live. Witness.

Those are the words by which Sister Mary Antona Ebo continues to live and those by which she was celebrated at a presentation July 30 at the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park.

Music, poetry and acting, peppered with photos and past video interviews with the Franciscan Sister of Mary and civil rights icon, were woven into a nearly two-hour program to recognize Sister Ebo. She's most famous for her role in the 1965 march in Selma, Ala., for voting rights for blacks, but also known for her groundbreaking ministry as a woman religious and in health care.

Religious sisters seek to promote consecrated life in new project

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Sister Carolyn Puccio, a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet, said it's unfortunate there's not a line of women wrapping around the block waiting to enter religious life.

"It's meaningful to be part of a group of women who are bright, articulate, engaged, educated, dedicated (and) generous," said Sister Carolyn, the delegate for religious for the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. "To be a part of that is a tremendous gift for me, personally, and an honor. And it humbles me."

The Kitchen Table

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At mid-morning on a recent Thursday, the kitchen was a flurry of activity as the chef and her assistants prepared the luncheon fare for that day.

Ham and cheese sliders, with potato wedges and fried pickles, for the main course, and homemade pudding for dessert.

Yum! And these sliders weren't just ham and cheese slapped on any old bun; they were the loving creation of Bertha Wherry, the lead chef for the day. She put her twist on a standard recipe to make it special.

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