women religious

Editorial | Encourage, engage and pray our way to more women religious.

St. Louis is losing an important ministry. On Aug. 24, the Little Sisters of the Poor announced they are leaving St. Louis after almost 150 years of serving the poor elderly. The reason? Too few sisters.

We've heard this before. Generations ago, many Catholic schools were run by a sister. Catholic health care ministries were run by religious, not corporations.

Women religious at assembly urged to face crisis with contemplation

Sister Marcia Allen, a Sister of St. Joseph of Concordia, Kansas, and president of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, delivers her address Aug. 10 to attendees at the LCWR assembly in Atlanta.

ATLANTA — About 800 members of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious gathered in Atlanta for their annual assembly Aug. 9-12.

With the theme of "Embracing the Mystery: Living Transformation," the sisters considered where God is moving in today's world as they face smaller and graying communities.

"The whole assembly is about listening to the movements of God, not only individually, but collectively," said Sister Annmarie Sanders, a member of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, who is LCWR's communications director.

National Catholic Sisters Week: Billboard campaign shines light on sisters’ faith in St. Louis

You've more than likely seen one around town. A blank billboard with one simple message in black type:

"We have faith in you, St. Louis.

— St. Louis Catholic Sisters."

Fifteen religious communities who are part of the group St. Louis Catholic Sisters have placed two dozen billboards with this message around the St. Louis area. The campaign, which coincides with National Catholic Sisters Week, March 8-14, is meant to instill pride in the community and a desire to work for its betterment, according to a press release.

Report: Sisters' numbers shrinking but growing more diverse

Benedictine nuns prayed in the chapel in late March at the Abbey of St. Walburga on a ranch in Virginia Dale, Colo. A new report on U.S. women religious said that religious life is becoming not only more multiethnic but more international as well.

WASHINGTON -- A new report on U.S. women religious said that religious life is becoming not only more multiethnic but more international as well.

The report, "Understanding U.S. Catholic Sisters Today," said that of all women who entered religious life in the past 10 years, only 57 percent were white, while 17 percent were Hispanic, 16 percent were Asian, and 8 percent were black -- including both African-American women and those born in Africa.

Donated sleeping mats are a labor of love

Dan Ward carried his colorful mat, woven of used plastic shopping bags, after it was given to him at Sts. Peter and Paul Parish Center in Soulard. Lisa Johnston | lisajohnston@archstl.org

Danny Ward took off his stocking cap and displayed a full head of gray hair to go with a scraggly gray beard.

"They call me the Silver Fox," he said, then chuckled.

The homeless man needed to keep his head covered on a night when the wind chill dipped below zero.

Vatican report calls U.S. women religious to continued dialogue

VATICAN CITY -- A massive, detailed Vatican-ordered investigation of U.S. communities of women religious ended with a call to the women themselves to continue discerning how best to live the Gospel in fidelity to their orders' founding ideals while facing steeply declining numbers and a rapidly aging membership.

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