women religious

Religious sisters seek to promote consecrated life in new project

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Sister Carolyn Puccio, a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet, said it's unfortunate there's not a line of women wrapping around the block waiting to enter religious life.

"It's meaningful to be part of a group of women who are bright, articulate, engaged, educated, dedicated (and) generous," said Sister Carolyn, the delegate for religious for the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. "To be a part of that is a tremendous gift for me, personally, and an honor. And it humbles me."

Discalced Carmelites discuss papal document on contemplative women religious

Lisa Johnston |  lisajohnston@archstl.org  |  Twitter: @aeternusphoto 

Sister Celine of the Carmel of St. Thérèse of Lisieux in Loretto, PA, talked in group discussion about the implications of Pope Francis' 2016 Apostolic Constitution "Vultum Dei quaerere" on cloistered life. The document focuses on women's contemplative life and has raised many questions about the Order's constitutions.  The nuns in the USA have asked their Superior General in Rome for help in clarifications and he has decided to come and meet with the nuns here. It is an historic gathering of Carmelites with 160 nuns from different cloisters are coming to St. Louis (many of whom have never left their cloisters) for three days of meetings.

An historic meeting among Discalced Carmelites in St. Louis in April helped the order to get a better pulse on its understanding of a papal document outlining new guidelines for contemplative religious communities.

Singing sisters serve the poor, create music for the soul

Sister Teresa of the pop band Siervas played the bass guitar during an undated concert. Sister Teresa and 11 other women, who are members of the Servants of the Plan of God, have taken their inspirational music to other countries but also do social service work in Peru.

LIMA, Peru — When people wave at members of the pop band Siervas as they drive through the city, the nuns in the musical group know they've arrived on the world stage.

The 12 women religious in the group — The Servants in English — have taken their inspirational music to other countries and created hits that their fans sing and carry in their hearts.

‘Convent crawl’ gives an experience of diversity in religious life

Sister Brenda Fritz, DC, worked with piano student Nyeal Biedenstein Feb. 6 as part of the after-school Presentation Arts Center at Our Lady of the Presentation Parish in Overland.

The former chapel in the convent building at Our Lady of the Presentation Church years ago was subdivided into two small rooms, an informal entry/waiting area and an office.

Nothing extraordinary about it ... except God's work still happens in that space.

Whereas the sounds of Mass or the silence of prayer once dominated, the musical notes of joy now fill the air. Under the auspice of Sister Brenda Fritz, DC, the parish's music director, the convent has been transformed into the Presentation Arts Center, an arts ministry thriving in its first year.

Editorial | Encourage, engage and pray our way to more women religious.

St. Louis is losing an important ministry. On Aug. 24, the Little Sisters of the Poor announced they are leaving St. Louis after almost 150 years of serving the poor elderly. The reason? Too few sisters.

We've heard this before. Generations ago, many Catholic schools were run by a sister. Catholic health care ministries were run by religious, not corporations.

Women religious at assembly urged to face crisis with contemplation

Sister Marcia Allen, a Sister of St. Joseph of Concordia, Kansas, and president of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, delivers her address Aug. 10 to attendees at the LCWR assembly in Atlanta.

ATLANTA — About 800 members of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious gathered in Atlanta for their annual assembly Aug. 9-12.

With the theme of "Embracing the Mystery: Living Transformation," the sisters considered where God is moving in today's world as they face smaller and graying communities.

"The whole assembly is about listening to the movements of God, not only individually, but collectively," said Sister Annmarie Sanders, a member of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, who is LCWR's communications director.

Syndicate content