women religious

Pregame prayer, solid teamwork clinched win for Loyola, says Sister Jean

Sister Jean Dolores Schmidt, 98, longtime chaplain of the Loyola University Chicago men’s basketball team and campus icon, prayed with the team in October 2017. Sister Jean credited pregame prayer and the players’ solid teamwork for the Ramblers’ thrilling last-second 64-62 NCAA Tournament win over the University of Miami March 15.

DALLAS — A religious sister who is the longtime chaplain of the Loyola University Chicago men's basketball team credited the pregame prayer and the players' solid teamwork for the Ramblers' thrilling, last-second 64-62 win over the University of Miami in the NCAA Tournament on March 15.

"Our team is so great and they don't care who makes the points as long as we win the game," Sister Jean Dolores Schmidt, 98, told a reporter with truTV.

‘Cornerstone’ of Marygrove helped children heal and grow

In 1983, Msgr. Robert Slattery, then president of Catholic Charities of St. Louis, recruited Sister Helen Negri to become the chief operating officer of Marygrove. She began with seven residents and built it to a multifaceted program of residential care for more than 200 children every day (with 1,300 served every year) with behavioral health problems.

The Sisters of the Good Shepherd had just relinquished the agency, and the staff had asked her where the other nuns were — she was it. She gave them her beeper number, and they used it liberally, Sister Helen said with a laugh.

From corn-husk shoes to old-time habits

Two Sisters of St. Mary (later Franciscan Sisters of Mary) worked in the pharmacy at St. Mary’s Infirmary in the 1900s. St. Mary’s Infirmary was the first hospital opened by the congregation in 1887.

By the time of the St. Louis Public Library's founding in 1865, Catholic sisters had already been at work for nearly a half-century in St. Louis.

Starting in 1818 with the Society of the Sacred Heart and St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, women religious came from across the pond to educate immigrants' children and care for poor, ill or otherwise vulnerable members of society. Along with men religious, they arrived in such numbers that St. Louis became known as the "Rome of the West," reminiscent of the Vatican.

Incarnate Word Sisters of Houston establish international novitiate in St. Louis

Sister Ita Harnett, postulant director for the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word novitiate in St. Louis, looked at the colors coming off the stained glass with formation director Sister Helena Adaku Ogbuji. The Sisters of Charity recently completed consolidation of novitiates from Kenya and Guatemala into the novitiate in St. Louis.

The Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word of Houston have established a new home for their international novitiate, right in the heart of the old Gaslight Square district of St. Louis.

Work was completed in December on the two-story, 3,300-square-foot facility at the intersection of Olive and Boyle streets in the Central West End. A blessing of the house was to have taken place Feb. 18.

Holy Cross students get a glimpse of religious life

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Rachel Schaefer had a simple question after Sister Maryellen Tierney, CSJ, shared her vocation story.

"How did you know?" the Holy Cross Academy seventh-grader asked.

"That's a good question; how does anyone know?" said Sister Maryellen, who attended Catholic grade schools and Rosati-Kain High School before entering the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet in 1957. A depiction of Jesus Christ's crucifixion resonated with her.

Religious sisters seek to promote consecrated life in new project

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Sister Carolyn Puccio, a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet, said it's unfortunate there's not a line of women wrapping around the block waiting to enter religious life.

"It's meaningful to be part of a group of women who are bright, articulate, engaged, educated, dedicated (and) generous," said Sister Carolyn, the delegate for religious for the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. "To be a part of that is a tremendous gift for me, personally, and an honor. And it humbles me."

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