Women religious

TWENTY SOMETHING | ‘Greater horizons’: Tending to each other and our common home

"One should leave a field better than you found it," an old farmer's saying went.

Sometimes that called for heavy lifting. Other times it just meant picking up a rock as you crossed and placing it at the field's edge.

That counsel stuck with Sister Amy Hereford, CSJ, who grew up on a 10-acre farm in Missouri where sheep roamed and blackberries grew wild. She planted whatever vegetable seemed to be lacking.

Singing sisters serve the poor, create music for the soul

Sister Teresa of the pop band Siervas played the bass guitar during an undated concert. Sister Teresa and 11 other women, who are members of the Servants of the Plan of God, have taken their inspirational music to other countries but also do social service work in Peru.

LIMA, Peru — When people wave at members of the pop band Siervas as they drive through the city, the nuns in the musical group know they've arrived on the world stage.

The 12 women religious in the group — The Servants in English — have taken their inspirational music to other countries and created hits that their fans sing and carry in their hearts.

Nuns are cool

The tweet asks: Got nuns?

The answer in this town is a resounding, "Yes."

Where would we be without them? There's no denying their important role in building the Archdiocese of St. Louis.

Strong-hearted, pioneering religious sisters came from Europe in the 19th century to lay the foundation for Catholic education, health care, social services and more. Then, smart and savvy religious sisters built on that foundation in the 20th century, bringing education to the masses and delivering quality health care while still ministering to the poor and downtrodden on society's fringes.

CCVI congregational leader reflects on diversity, charism

Sister Teresa Maya, congregational leader of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word, visited Incarnate Word Academy during Mission Week. Her first stop at the school was to mingle through the Mission Carnival, an event which will raise money for the Down Syndrome Association of St Louis. Sister Tere gave her best attempt at the ball toss booth while students gathered around her.

Sister Teresa Maya of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word remembers watching the news in Ferguson unfold from the sisters' motherhouse in San Antonio, Texas, and wondered — worried, actually — how her community could make a difference.

One of the sisters' ministries, Incarnate Word Academy, is in the tiny village of Bel-Nor, about 10 minutes from Ferguson. The all-girls Catholic high school has been present there since 1932.

‘Convent crawl’ gives an experience of diversity in religious life

Sister Brenda Fritz, DC, worked with piano student Nyeal Biedenstein Feb. 6 as part of the after-school Presentation Arts Center at Our Lady of the Presentation Parish in Overland.

The former chapel in the convent building at Our Lady of the Presentation Church years ago was subdivided into two small rooms, an informal entry/waiting area and an office.

Nothing extraordinary about it ... except God's work still happens in that space.

Whereas the sounds of Mass or the silence of prayer once dominated, the musical notes of joy now fill the air. Under the auspice of Sister Brenda Fritz, DC, the parish's music director, the convent has been transformed into the Presentation Arts Center, an arts ministry thriving in its first year.

Editorial | Encourage, engage and pray our way to more women religious.

St. Louis is losing an important ministry. On Aug. 24, the Little Sisters of the Poor announced they are leaving St. Louis after almost 150 years of serving the poor elderly. The reason? Too few sisters.

We've heard this before. Generations ago, many Catholic schools were run by a sister. Catholic health care ministries were run by religious, not corporations.

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