volunteer

Catholic Charities, St. Vincent de Paul poised to help those impacted by flooding

Sandbags were removed surrounding the S. Central Avenue business district at Dreyer Ave. in Eureka. The wall of sandbags reached 7-8 feet and were successful in helping with the flood. In a virtual replay of floods in the final week of December 2015, flooding along the Meramec River, its tributaries and the Mississippi River inundated the St. Louis area in the first week of May, closing Interstates 44 and 55 and turning Eureka and Fenton into islands. Homes and businesses from Pacific and points west to Arnold in the south and beyond were devastated.

Catholic Charities of St. Louis has stepped in to assist in the long-term recovery efforts of those affected by recent flooding in the St. Louis region.

Hundreds of households and businesses in the 11 counties of the Archdiocese of St. Louis have experienced damage from the flooding, many of them previously impacted by flooding in late December 2015/early January 2016.

‘God is with us’

Floodwater from the Meramec River swamped homes in Pacific on May 2. Parishioners of affected parishes in Pacific, Eureka, Valley Park, Fenton, Arnold and other areas assisted with sand bagging and other prevention measures.

In a virtual replay of floods in the final week of December 2015, flooding along the Meramec River, its tributaries and the Mississippi River inundated the St. Louis area in the first week of May, closing Interstates 44 and 55 and turning Eureka and Fenton into islands. Homes and businesses from Pacific and points west to Arnold in the south and beyond were devasted.

FOR THE JOURNEY | Volunteer corps offer experiences to build faith

The Jesuit Volunteer Corps was young — and so was I — when I arrived at a remote Alaskan village to teach school at a Jesuit boarding school for Native Alaskan students as a member of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps.

Cell phones and the Internet did not exist. In the village of St. Mary's, and in other villages on the far-flung Alaskan tundra, there was no television reception. A phone existed for the village — just one — and it was in a man's home.

102-year-old sees importance of faith, connection to parish

Lucille Seper is 102 years old and volunteers at the reception desk at Garden Villas South once a week on Tuesday afternoons. Here, she recieved a visit from Marilyn Muegge, minister to senior parishioners at St. Mary Magdalen Parish in south St. Louis. Seper is a parishioner at St. Mary Magdalen and a resident at Garden Villas.

Every morning when she rises, Lucille Seper does her exercises. But it's not the push-up or jumping-jacks variety. Instead, Seper is going for spiritual exercises — armed with a rosary, her list of prayer intentions in hand.

"That's the first order of business is to say my Rosary," she said. "Before I ever have my breakfast."

Habitat for Humanity volunteer enjoys helping people

James Kennedy, left, is being honored as a 2016 Ageless Remarkable St. Louisan by the St. Andrew’s Resources for Seniors System. He and fellow volunteer Kathy Brasser served a meal to homeless and needy people at St. Vincent de Paul Parish Oct. 1.

When James Kennedy retired in 1994, he envisioned an opportunity to complete projects around his house.

Kennedy, 77, retired at age 55 as chief information officer at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

Editorial | Encourage, engage and pray our way to more women religious.

St. Louis is losing an important ministry. On Aug. 24, the Little Sisters of the Poor announced they are leaving St. Louis after almost 150 years of serving the poor elderly. The reason? Too few sisters.

We've heard this before. Generations ago, many Catholic schools were run by a sister. Catholic health care ministries were run by religious, not corporations.

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