Vocations and ordination

St. Clement pastor is Fisher of Men, inspiring vocations through love of his priesthood

Everyone in attendance applauded Sunday as Fr. Christopher Martin (not shown) presented Msgr. James E. Pieper of St. Clement of Rome parish with the first annual Fishers of Men award  after the 9 a.m. Mass at the parish.

Msgr. James Pieper is a self-described "happy priest" whose love of his vocation is obvious to all who meet him. The pastor of St. Clement of Rome in Des Peres, his joyful witness to Christ and example to others has earned him the inaugural Fisher of Men Award from the archdiocesan Office of Vocations.

Women religious hear God’s call — and answer it

Sister Mariana Thayer of the Dominican Sisters of St. Cecilia Congregation talked to students as they worked on a religion class project at St. Joseph School in Cottleville.

National Vocation Awareness Week, observed this year Jan. 9-14, is the annual celebration in the United States to promote vocations to the priesthood, diaconate and consecrated life through prayer and education, and to renew prayers and support for those who are considering vocations.

Following God's call to consecrated life has been grace-filled and liberating for three local women religious.

"I felt at home," said Sister Mariana Thayer, a Dominican Sister of the Congregation of St. Cecilia in Nashville, Tenn., who teaches at St. Joseph School in Cottleville.

Father Patrick Driscoll's vocation journey took many twists, turns

Father Patrick Driscoll visited with fourth-grade students at Assumption school, and as he spoke he asked them questions. Father Driscoll rewarded what he considered great answers with holy cards.

National Vocation Awareness Week, observed this year Jan. 9-14, is the annual celebration in the United States to promote vocations to the priesthood, diaconate and consecrated life through prayer and education, and to renew prayers and support for those who are considering vocations.

Father Patrick Driscoll's vocation journey took a number of twists and turns -- he was ordained at age 48 -- but one of the key points occurred when a fellow parishioner asked him if he'd consider the priesthood.

Pay attention to possible vocations, Kenrick-Glennon seminarian says

John Stearns, a theology student at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary in Shrewsbury from the Colorado Springs Diocese, has encouraged men who have thoughts about a vocation to follow through.

National Vocation Awareness Week, observed this year Jan. 9-14, is the annual celebration in the United States to promote vocations to the priesthood, diaconate and consecrated life through prayer and education, and to renew prayers and support for those who are considering vocations.

When John Stearns talks about vocations he makes sure to remind people to ask others -- even single professional men who may seem settled in their career -- if they would consider a vocation.

Catholic seminary enrollment up, candidates impress with their zeal

Seminarian John Schneier prayed Evening Prayer in a chapel at the former Franciscan Sisters of Mary Convent in Richmond Heights, the temporary home of Kenrick-Glennon Seminary.

WASHINGTON -- In his first months as rector of Theological College in Washington, Father Phillip J. Brown has been confronting a problem that the national diocesan seminary for the U.S. Catholic Church "has not had for a long time" -- it is bursting at the seams.

Enrollment is maxed out for the 2011-12 academic year at 90 seminarians. Five of those seminarians are back in their dioceses this year gaining pastoral experience, but a Sulpician seminarian and five priests from other countries also live there, bringing the total number of residents to 91 plus faculty members.

CSJs have long history of deaf education here

No article on deaf ministry in the St. Louis Archdiocese would be complete with mentioning the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet.

The sisters arrived in St. Louis in 1836 at the invitation of Bishop Joseph Rosati to serve the deaf, as well as other marginalized people. A year later the sisters established St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf in Carondelet, now part of south St. Louis. Since then, the school has moved twice, first to University City and later to Chesterfield, and the CSJs have continued their long ministry to the deaf community.

Syndicate content