vocations

For seminarian, God wrote straight with crooked lines — or headlines

Anthony Federico, a seminarian from the Archdiocese of Hartford, Conn., prayed in the chapel at Theological College in Washington Oct. 25. After getting fired from a job at ESPN because of a poorly-phrased headline, Federico took another job which allowed him to go to Mass daily and discern his call to the priesthood.

WASHINGTON — Anthony Federico is one of three seminarians from the Archdiocese of Hartford, Conn., studying at Theological College in Washington. But he's the only one of them to inadvertently create an internet outcry.

Federico, who is 33 and in the third year of his theologate at Theological College, grew up in Connecticut, a big fan of Major League Baseball's New York Yankees and the National Hockey League's Hartford Whalers.

Editorial | Ingredients for a vocation to the priesthood

Father Clark Philipp was among four priests ordained by Archbishop Robert J. Carlson at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis on May 27.

Eight of every 10 men in the 2017 class of ordinations to the priesthood were encouraged by about four people, including parish priests, friends or other parishioners. According to the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate's (CARA) annual survey, the ordinands also were, on average, 16 years old when they first considered a vocation to the priesthood, and religious ordinands reported they knew the members of their religious institute an average of six years before entering.

Pedaling priests to bike across Peoria Diocese seeking vocation prayers

Three priests from the Diocese of Peoria, Ill., rode their bicycles across the diocese, a trek of 350 miles, from April 24-28 to inspire prayers for vocations. The “Priests Pedaling for Prayers” are Fathers Michael Pica, Tom Otto and Adam Cesarek.

PEORIA, Ill. — Being a priest has made Father Michael Pica, Father Adam Cesarek and Father Tom Otto so happy that they are preparing to share their joy with people from Rock Island to Danville — literally.

From April 24 to 28, the three priests rode their bikes 350 miles across the Diocese of Peoria — the width of Illinois — to raise awareness for vocations and show people that priesthood is a wonderful life. Along the way, they stopped at schools and parishes to encourage prayers for vocations and tell the story of their own call to priestly service.

Midshipman answers the call at Kenrick-Glennon

While attending the U.S. Naval Academy last year, current seminarian Andrew Hunt, left, realized that the call to the priesthood was stronger than his desire to stay at the Academy. He credits the Catholic community at the Naval Academy with encouraging his discernment.

With an appointment to the United States Naval Academy, Andrew Hunt seemed to have his plans set for at least the next nine years, maybe more.

He'd spend four years at the academy in Annapolis, Md., then five more as a commissioned officer in the Navy. After that, he'd either become career military, just as his father, John, was for 34 years in the Air Force, or parlay his Naval experience into a rewarding career.

Either way, it seemed that he would fulfill the dreams nurtured by tagging along as a young child with his dad to Scott Air Force Base in Mascoutah, Ill.

Crying 'buckets of tears' | Little Sisters of the Poor withdrawing from St. Louis residence

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Patricia Stenger looked at five senior living facilities before she found the Little Sisters of the Poor. She knew their residence was place she wanted to call home.

Stenger, who moved into the Old North St. Louis residence in March, became tearful when she learned the sisters were withdrawing from their ministry in the Archdiocese of St. Louis after 147 years.

Little Sisters of the Poor announce they are departing from residence in St. Louis

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The Little Sisters of the Poor are withdrawing from their ministry of caring for the elderly poor in the Archdiocese of St. Louis after 147 years of service.

The sisters cited a decrease in sufficient vocations to effectively staff the residence in north St. Louis, in the spirit of the community's foundress St. Jeanne Jugan.

"We are eternally grateful for the support and love we received during our many years in St. Louis," said Mother Gonzague Castro, local superior. "We love the city nearly as much as we love the people we work with and care for."

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