violence

Rev. King’s words on nonviolence need to be lived today, speakers say

Faith leaders gathered near the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Oct. 2 in Washington, D.C., to commemorate Rev. King’s 1957 essay about “Nonviolence and Racial Justice.”

WASHINGTON — The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s support of nonviolence to bring about social change applies as much to today's society as it did when Rev. King put his philosophy to paper 60 years ago, said speakers at an Oct. 2 news conference at the memorial dedicated to the civil rights figure in Washington.

The news conference was scheduled in advance of, and held the day after, the Las Vegas shooting spree that killed 59 people and injured more than 500 people. That fact only underscored the importance of Rev. King's message, according to the speakers.

Bishops call for stand 'against the evil of racism, white supremacy and neo-Nazism'

White nationalists clashed with counter-protesters at a rally in Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 12. "Only the light of Christ can quench the torches of hatred and violence. Let us pray for peace," stated Bishop Francis X. DiLorenzo of Richmond, Va., the diocese in which Charlottesville is located.

WASHINGTON — In the aftermath of a chaos- and hate-filled weekend in Virginia, Catholic bishops and groups throughout the nation called for peace after three people died and several others were injured following clashes between pacifists, protesters and white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, Aug. 11 and 12.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Christians fight evil with love, sacrifice, never with violence

Pope Francis greeted the crowd as he left his general audience June 28 in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican. In his weekly catechesis, the pope continued his series on Christian hope by focusing on what gives Christians strength and perseverance.

VATICAN CITY — Christians are called to detach themselves from power, reject violence and sacrifice themselves for God and others out of love, Pope Francis said.

Christians must live the way Christ chose to: not as "persecutors, but persecuted; not arrogant, but meek; not as snake-oil salesmen, but subservient to the truth; not impostors, but honest," he said June 28 at his weekly general audience.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Behind hatred, violence is an unloved heart

In his general audience June 14 in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis focused on the certainty of hope that comes from feeling loved as children of God.

VATICAN CITY — Violence and hatred often are signs that a person is unhappy and feels unloved and unwanted, Pope Francis said.

In world today, people — especially children and youths — often feel that unless "we are strong, attractive and beautiful, no one will care about us," the pope said June 14 at his weekly general audience.

"When an adolescent is not or does not feel loved, violence can arise. Behind so many forms of social hate and hooliganism, there is often a heart that has not been recognized," he said.

Cdl. Cupich: Church will do everything it can ‘to end scourge of violence’

People carried crosses with names of victims of gun violence as part a march in downtown Chicago to remember those killed in gun violence in 2016. On April 4, Cardinal Blaise J. Cupich announced an initiative to increase the work of current anti-violence programs in the Archdiocese of Chicago.

CHICAGO — Chicago Cardinal Blase J. Cupich April 4 announced an initiative to increase the work of current anti-violence programs in parishes and schools and those run by Mercy Home for Boys and Girls, Catholic Charities and Kolbe House, the archdiocese's jail ministry.

The Archdiocese of Chicago also will seek out partnerships to increase programs that will help break the cycle of violence.

Exhibit portrays the real cost of unrelenting violence

"Sudarios" by Erika Diettes is a collection of portraits of women reliving "the moment that divided her life in two," alive but not living with grief from witnessing family embers who were victims of violence during unrest in Colombia.

The exhibition of 20 intimate portraits of women reliving a tragic period of their lives is moving — both figuratively and literally.

The photographs by Colombian artist Erika Diettes in "Sudarios" are of women who were forced to witness the torture and murder of their loved ones during Colombia's 50 years of civil conflict. The display is carefully designed to make the portraits come alive.

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