USCCB

Cdl. DiNardo elected USCCB president, Abp. Gomez elected vice president

Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Ky., outgoing president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, rear, applauded Nov. 15 after Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, seated, was elected president during the annual fall general assembly of the USCCB in Baltimore.

BALTIMORE -- Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston was elected president of the U.S. bishops' conference Nov. 15 for a three-year term to begin at the conclusion of the bishops' annual fall general assembly in Baltimore.

Cardinal DiNardo collected a majority of votes on the first ballot of voting during the second day of the bishops' public session. Based on the number of bishops voting, 104 votes were needed for election, and Cardinal DiNardo -- the current vice president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops -- received 113.

After campaign rhetoric about deportation, bishops send message on immigrants' dignity

BALTIMORE -- In a letter read Nov. 14 during the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the chairman of the bishops' Committee on Migration, Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio L. Elizondo of Seattle, called on President-elect Donald Trump "to continue to protect the inherent dignity of refugees and migrants."

Archbishop calls for bishops' racism statement given election tension

Atlanta Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory, center, and other prelates applauded Nov. 14 after an address by Archbishop Christophe Pierre, apostolic nuncio to the United States, during the annual fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore.

BALTIMORE -- Earlier this year, as communities faced tensions, protests and violence, following a spate of shooting and killings of black men by police, Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz, of Louisville, Ky., as president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, asked dioceses across the country to observe a day of prayer for peace.

He also wanted the bishops to look for ways they could help the suffering communities, as well as police affected by the incidents.

Archbishop Gregory to chair USCCB task force on race

Atlanta Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory, center, listens to a speaker Nov. 16 during the opening of the 2015 fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore.

WASHINGTON — Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory of Atlanta has been appointed as chair of a new task force of the U.S. bishops to deal with racial issues brought into public consciousness following a series of summertime shootings that left both citizens and police officers among those dead.

Some key points from USCCB General Assembly statement on racism

Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, released a statement Sept. 9, 2014, on the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act addressing the importance of working against racism. Some of the points he makes are:

• We honor the many civic, business, and religious leaders, students, laborers, educators and all others of good will who courageously stood up for racial justice against bigotry, violence, ignorance, and fear. We are especially grateful for the vital contributions of the faith community during this period.

Bishop disturbed by calls to end resettlement of Syrian refugees in U.S.

Syrian refugees waited on the Syrian side of the border near Sanliurfa, Turkey, June 10. Bishop Eusebio Elizondo, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Migration, says the United States should welcome Syrian refugees and work for peace.

BALTIMORE -- The head of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Migration said he was disturbed by calls from federal and state officials for an end to the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the United States.

"These refugees are fleeing terror themselves -- violence like we have witnessed in Paris," said Seattle Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio Elizondo, chairman of the migration committee. "They are extremely vulnerable families, women, and children who are fleeing for their lives. We cannot and should not blame them for the actions of a terrorist organization."

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