USCCB

U.S. bishops take on immigration, racism at fall assembly

Bishops exchanged the sign of peace during Mass Nov. 12 at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Baltimore on the eve of the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

BALTIMORE — At the start of their annual fall assembly in Baltimore Nov. 13, U.S. Catholic bishops faced some big issues — immigration and racism — straight on and zeroed in on how to raise the national level of discussion on these topics starting in the church pews.

They acknowledged the current polarization in the country and divides within the Catholic Church and stressed their responsibility as Church leaders to promote immigration reform, educate parishioners on justice issues and listen to those affected by "sins of racism."

Archbishop Vigneron elected next USCCB secretary, Archbishop Naumann elected chair of pro-life activities

Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann of Kansas City, Kan., center, looked on as Bishop Oscar Cantu of Las Cruces, N.M., chairman of the U.S. bishops' international policy committee, respondedto a reporter's question during a Nov. 13 news conference at the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore.

BALTIMORE -- Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron of Detroit will be the next secretary of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, taking office next November.

Bishops voted 96-88 to elect Archbishop Vigneron Nov. 14 during their fall general assembly.

Votes also were cast for a new chairman of the bishops' Committee for Religious Liberty and chairmen-elect for the committees on Communications, Cultural Diversity in the Church, Doctrine, National Collections and Pro-Life Activities.

Bishops form new body to address ‘sin of racism’ that ‘inflicts’ nation

WASHINGTON — Saying there is an "urgent need" to address "the sin of racism" in the country and find solutions to it, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has established a new Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism and named one of the country's African-American Catholic bishops to chair it.

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, USCCB president, initiated the committee Aug. 23 "to focus on addressing the sin of racism in our society, and even in our Church, and the urgent need to come together as a society to find solutions."

Bishops address religious liberty, health care, worship

Bishop Kevin C. Rhoades of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Ind., left, and Bishop Shelton J. Fabre of Houma-Thibodaux, La., prayed June 14 during the opening session of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ annual spring assembly in Indianapolis.

INDIANAPOLIS — Reflecting their concern that religious liberty at home and abroad remains a top priority, the U.S. bishops during their spring general assembly in Indianapolis voted to make permanent their Ad Hoc Committee for Religious Liberty.

Voting 132-53 with five abstentions June 15, the second day of the assembly, the bishops' action came less than a week before the start of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' fifth annual Fortnight for Freedom June 21-July 4. The observance is a two-week period of prayer, advocacy and education on religious freedom.

U.S. bishops ask Catholics to accompany migrants and refugees

A woman in New York walked Sept. 16 past hundreds of refugee life jackets collected from the beaches of Greece. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops urged Catholics to “not lose sight of the fact that behind every policy is the story of a person in search of a better life.”

WASHINGTON — The U.S. bishops in a pastoral reflection called all Catholics to do what each of them can "to accompany migrants and refugees who seek a better life in the United States."

Titled "Living as a People of God in Unsettled Times," the reflection was issued March 22 "in solidarity with those who have been forced to flee their homes due to violence, conflict or fear in their native lands," according to a news release from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

USCCB Fall Assembly | Bishops celebrate Mass at historic black Catholic church; elect new officers

Bishop Yousif B. Habash of Our Lady of Deliverance Syriac Catholic Diocese lit a candle at a prayer service for peace in the world Nov. 15 at St. Vincent de Paul Church in Baltimore. The service was part of an evening program sponsored by several Catholic organizations that coincided with the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops so that the bishops could attend.

BALTIMORE — The U.S. bishops broke from tradition during this year's fall assembly by celebrating Mass at a West Baltimore church known as the "Mother Church" of black Catholics, rather than Baltimore's historic basilica.

"I pray our presence will convey the Church's solidarity with you," said Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori in opening remarks Nov. 14 to a few dozen parishioners attending the Mass with more than 250 bishops filling nearly every pew of the small church.

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