USCCB

Listening is key to bishops’ committee against racism, says new chair

WASHINGTON — Bishop Shelton J. Fabre of Houma-Thibodaux, La., the newly appointed chair of the Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, said he looks forward to serving the bishops in this role as Catholic Church leaders continue to respond to the "sin" of racism.

The bishop was appointed to the position by Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, USCCB president, following the resignation of Bishop George V. Murry of Youngstown, Ohio, from this role after his recent diagnosis with a form of acute leukemia.

U.S. bishops who’ve seen gun violence up close call for end to ‘madness’

WASHINGTON — Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput knows all too well the pain left behind after incidents such as the 2018 Valentine's Day shooting that has so far taken 17 lives at Florida's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

As archbishop in Denver, he took part in the funerals of Catholics killed by fellow classmates at Columbine High School in 1999. The Florida killings, Feb. 14 which authorities suspect were perpetrated by Nikolas Cruz, a former classmate of many of the dead, seemed to bring back the pain.

U.S. bishops take on immigration, racism at fall assembly

Bishops exchanged the sign of peace during Mass Nov. 12 at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Baltimore on the eve of the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

BALTIMORE — At the start of their annual fall assembly in Baltimore Nov. 13, U.S. Catholic bishops faced some big issues — immigration and racism — straight on and zeroed in on how to raise the national level of discussion on these topics starting in the church pews.

They acknowledged the current polarization in the country and divides within the Catholic Church and stressed their responsibility as Church leaders to promote immigration reform, educate parishioners on justice issues and listen to those affected by "sins of racism."

Archbishop Vigneron elected next USCCB secretary, Archbishop Naumann elected chair of pro-life activities

Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann of Kansas City, Kan., center, looked on as Bishop Oscar Cantu of Las Cruces, N.M., chairman of the U.S. bishops' international policy committee, respondedto a reporter's question during a Nov. 13 news conference at the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore.

BALTIMORE -- Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron of Detroit will be the next secretary of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, taking office next November.

Bishops voted 96-88 to elect Archbishop Vigneron Nov. 14 during their fall general assembly.

Votes also were cast for a new chairman of the bishops' Committee for Religious Liberty and chairmen-elect for the committees on Communications, Cultural Diversity in the Church, Doctrine, National Collections and Pro-Life Activities.

Bishops form new body to address ‘sin of racism’ that ‘inflicts’ nation

WASHINGTON — Saying there is an "urgent need" to address "the sin of racism" in the country and find solutions to it, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has established a new Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism and named one of the country's African-American Catholic bishops to chair it.

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, USCCB president, initiated the committee Aug. 23 "to focus on addressing the sin of racism in our society, and even in our Church, and the urgent need to come together as a society to find solutions."

Bishops address religious liberty, health care, worship

Bishop Kevin C. Rhoades of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Ind., left, and Bishop Shelton J. Fabre of Houma-Thibodaux, La., prayed June 14 during the opening session of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ annual spring assembly in Indianapolis.

INDIANAPOLIS — Reflecting their concern that religious liberty at home and abroad remains a top priority, the U.S. bishops during their spring general assembly in Indianapolis voted to make permanent their Ad Hoc Committee for Religious Liberty.

Voting 132-53 with five abstentions June 15, the second day of the assembly, the bishops' action came less than a week before the start of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' fifth annual Fortnight for Freedom June 21-July 4. The observance is a two-week period of prayer, advocacy and education on religious freedom.

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