unity

Pentecost is celebration of unity in diversity

VATICAN CITY — The Holy Spirit continues to give Christians different gifts and to call them to share those gifts with each other in a community marked by forgiveness and "unity in diversity," Pope Francis said on Pentecost.

"In a way both creative and unexpected," the pope said, the Holy Spirit "generates diversity, for in every age He causes new and varied charisms to blossom. Then He brings about unity: He joins together, gathers and restores harmony."

Week of Prayer for Christian Unity focuses on overcoming division

Numerous people walked through a gap in the Berlin Wall at the Bernauer Strasse in Berlin Nov. 10, 1989, after the border was opened. The prayer intentions written by Germans for the 2017 Week of Prayer for Christian Unity call to mind the Berlin Wall.

VATICAN CITY — When a group of German Christians was asked in 2014 to prepare materials for the 2017 Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, their choice of a "wall" as a symbol of sin, evil and division explicitly referred to the Berlin Wall.

The German reflections on the power of prayer to bring down walls and the Gospel call to reconciliation were adopted by the World Council of Church's Faith and Order Commission and the Vatican's Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and proposed to Christians worldwide for the Jan. 18-25 octave of prayer.

Christian Unity Week service to stress reconciliation

Reconciliation, especially focusing on the 500th anniversary of the beginnings of the Reformation, will be stressed during the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, celebrated this year from Jan. 18-25.

The week will be highlighted on Sunday, Jan. 22, with an ecumenical prayer service and reception at 7 p.m. at St. Justin Martyr Church, 11910 Eddie and Park Road in Sunset Hills. Rev. Michael Malone, Lutheran ecumenical officer, will preach. Archbishop Robert J. Carlson will preside.

Catholics’ postelection to-do list: work for unity, healing

U.S. President Barack Obama shook hands with President-elect Donald Trump at a Nov. 10 meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington.

WASHINGTON — All the distrust, vitriol and rancor stirred up during the 2016 presidential election campaign did not go away when votes were tallied.

The Nov. 8 election's outcome, for many, only added more layers of frustration, anger and fear, prompting dozens of protests across the country.

Political leaders, including Hillary Clinton, President-elect Donald Trump and President Barack Obama, acknowledged the disunity and urged people after the election to try to work together.

Editorial | A time for unity

The speeches by President-elect Donald Trump and former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton the day after the Nov. 8 election are heartening and, we hope, heartfelt.

Both talked about the nation coming together to overcome divides that were evident during the election campaigns. Trump praised his opponent, saying that we owe her a major debt of gratitude for her service to our country.

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