Supreme Court

President Trump picks Kavanaugh as Supreme Court nominee

Brett Kavanaugh, a Catholic and a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, smiled July 9 at the White House in Washington after President Donald Trump named him his Supreme Court nominee.

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump announced July 9 that his nominee for the Supreme Court is Judge Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge in Washington and a Catholic who once clerked for retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.

"What matters is not a judge's personal views but whether they can set aside those views to do what the law and the Constitution require," Trump said in his announcement at the White House, adding: "I am pleased to say I have found, without doubt, such a person."

He said the nominee has "impeccable credentials" and is "considered a judge's judge."

Trump has chance to reshape court in choosing Kennedy’s successor

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump has the chance to reshape the Supreme Court by filling the vacancy created by Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement.

Replacing Kennedy, who is Catholic and has been on the court since 1988, with anyone who was on his list of potential nominees will probably turn the court to the right on social issues and leave it about where it is on economic issues, according to legal experts who spoke to Catholic News Service.

On July 9, Trump announced Brett Kavanaugh, of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, as his nominee. Kavanaugh is Catholic.

Supreme Court: Calif. law requiring pregnancy centers to post notices on abortion services violates free speech

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 June 26 that a California law that placed requirements on crisis pregnancy centers that oppose abortion violated the First Amendment.

In its decision in National Institute of Family and Life Advocates (NIFLA) v. Becerra, the court found that the law changes the content of the clinic's speech "by compelling petitioners to speak a particular message," and that the law went further than being a mere "regulation of professional conduct that incidentally burdens speech."

Judge Neil Gorsuch nominated to fill Supreme Court vacancy

Judge Neil Gorsuch spoke after U.S. President Donald Trump nominated him to be a U.S. Supreme Court justice Jan. 31 at the White House in Washington. If confirmed, Gorsuch will fill the seat that has been empty since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia last February.

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch to fill the seat on the U.S. Supreme Court that has been empty since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia in February 2016.

Trump described Gorsuch as a man the country needs, adding his pick for the high court already has had bipartisan support. "Judge Gorsuch has outstanding legal skills, a brilliant mind, tremendous discipline," he said in announcing his nominee Jan. 31 at the White House.

U.S. abortion rate at its lowest since 1973 Supreme Court ruling

WASHINGTON — The U.S. abortion rate is down to its lowest level since the Supreme Court made abortion legal virtually on demand in 1973, and the rate is half of its early-1980s peak.

According to a study issued Jan. 17 by the Guttmacher Institute, the abortion rate for U.S. women ages 15-44 is 14.6 per 1,000 in 2014, the last year for which statistics are available. The figure represents a 14 percent decline from the 2011 numbers, and less than half of the 1981 rate of 29.4 abortions per 1,000 women of child-bearing age.

U.S. Supreme Court strikes down regulations on Texas abortion clinics

A young pro-life supporter stood outside the U.S. Supreme Court June 26 during protests in Washington. The following day the Supreme Court ruled 5-3 in Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt, striking down two provisions of a 2013 Texas law regulating abortion in that state.

WASHINGTON -– In a 5-3 vote June 27, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down restrictions on Texas abortion clinics that required them to comply with standards of ambulatory surgical centers and required their doctors to have admitting privileges at local hospitals.

The case, Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt, challenged a 2013 state law, H.B. 2, placing the requirements on the state's abortion clinics. Opponents of the law claimed the requirements were aimed at closing abortion clinics. But the state and many pro-life advocates maintained that the law protected women's health.

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