Supreme Court

Judge Neil Gorsuch nominated to fill Supreme Court vacancy

Judge Neil Gorsuch spoke after U.S. President Donald Trump nominated him to be a U.S. Supreme Court justice Jan. 31 at the White House in Washington. If confirmed, Gorsuch will fill the seat that has been empty since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia last February.

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch to fill the seat on the U.S. Supreme Court that has been empty since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia in February 2016.

Trump described Gorsuch as a man the country needs, adding his pick for the high court already has had bipartisan support. "Judge Gorsuch has outstanding legal skills, a brilliant mind, tremendous discipline," he said in announcing his nominee Jan. 31 at the White House.

U.S. abortion rate at its lowest since 1973 Supreme Court ruling

WASHINGTON — The U.S. abortion rate is down to its lowest level since the Supreme Court made abortion legal virtually on demand in 1973, and the rate is half of its early-1980s peak.

According to a study issued Jan. 17 by the Guttmacher Institute, the abortion rate for U.S. women ages 15-44 is 14.6 per 1,000 in 2014, the last year for which statistics are available. The figure represents a 14 percent decline from the 2011 numbers, and less than half of the 1981 rate of 29.4 abortions per 1,000 women of child-bearing age.

U.S. Supreme Court strikes down regulations on Texas abortion clinics

A young pro-life supporter stood outside the U.S. Supreme Court June 26 during protests in Washington. The following day the Supreme Court ruled 5-3 in Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt, striking down two provisions of a 2013 Texas law regulating abortion in that state.

WASHINGTON -– In a 5-3 vote June 27, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down restrictions on Texas abortion clinics that required them to comply with standards of ambulatory surgical centers and required their doctors to have admitting privileges at local hospitals.

The case, Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt, challenged a 2013 state law, H.B. 2, placing the requirements on the state's abortion clinics. Opponents of the law claimed the requirements were aimed at closing abortion clinics. But the state and many pro-life advocates maintained that the law protected women's health.

Catholics make case against HHS contraception mandate

WASHINGTON — During oral arguments March 23 at the Supreme Court, attorneys on both sides of the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive requirement examined how the mandate either violates or strikes a balance with religious freedom.

Lawyers representing the seven groups of plaintiffs said the federal government's so-called accommodation for religious employers to arrange for a third party to provide contraceptive coverage in health plans was inconsistent because the government already had been able to provide churches an exemption from the requirement.

Supporters show love for Little Sisters of the Poor

A service day at the Little Sisters of the Poor St. Louis Residence included packing Easter eggs with candy. Sister Paul Mary Wilson, LSP, dumped a fresh load of candy onto the table as Breanna Colombini, her 15-month-old daughter Gianna, Katie Sleeman and Kasia Penna filled the eggs.

Katie Sleeman, Breanna Colombini, Rachel Kondro and a half dozen others from Women Speak for Themselves prepared to give Kisses to the elderly residents of the Little Sisters of the Poor Residence in north St. Louis.

Catholics make case against HHS contraception mandate

Little Sisters of the Poor watched news of the Supreme Court case Zubik v. Burell March 23 at their convent in St. Louis

WASHINGTON — During oral arguments March 23 at the Supreme Court, attorneys on both sides of the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive requirement examined how the mandate either violates or strikes a balance with religious freedom.

Lawyers representing the seven groups of plaintiffs said the federal government's so-called accommodation for religious employers to arrange for a third party to provide contraceptive coverage in health plans was inconsistent because the government already had been able to provide churches an exemption from the requirement.

Syndicate content