sunday scripture

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Receiving mercy is our re-entry into God’s friendship

The readings for the Fourth Sunday of Lent illustrate a simple fact: Man's best friend is God, while his two worst enemies are his own flesh and the Evil One.

God revealed to Judah a plan for its future, but the people of Judah had other plans for their happiness. "Early and often did the Lord, the God of their fathers, send His messengers to them, for He had compassion on His people and His dwelling place."

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | The inner silence produced by God’s word brings relief to our spirit

What are the sounds that drive us? Recently I was waiting at a red light and saw a driver in a car opposite me. He was bobbing his head up and down and side to side rhythmically. The movements seemed so extreme that I wondered how he could tell when the red light changed.

Granted, the body was simply responding in a musical way to the rhythms on his radio. Thank God there was a reason his body responded in this patterned way. If that weren't the case, I would think that the person might be in need of deliverance from unclean spirits.

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Christ’s call to us is an answer to our hunger for the infinite

Perhaps the responsorial psalm for the third Sunday in Ordinary Time summarizes God's movement in the day's readings. God answers mankind's hunger for the infinite and He is man's light, salvation and refuge.

He alone speaks to the deepest hunger for the infinite placed in the heart of man. "One thing I ask of the Lord; this I seek: to dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, that I may gaze on the loveliness of the Lord and contemplate His temple," the psalmist wrote. "Wait for the Lord with courage; be stouthearted, and wait for the Lord."

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Keep your eyes fixed on our heavenly treasure

Bishop Robert J. Hermann

The readings for the Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time are a great gift to us because they remind us that our greatest gifts aren't possessions, but God found within us.

In the first reading, the author reflects on the fruits of human labor. For example, the man who has labored "with wisdom and knowledge and skill" must leave all his property to "another who has not labored over it."

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Be wholly committed to following Jesus

Perhaps the responsorial psalm for the 13th Sunday in Ordinary Time captures the theme of the day's reading best. "I set the Lord ever before me; with Him at my right hand I shall not be disturbed."

Elijah does exactly this in the first reading. He has just undergone a conversion from self-pity, depression and despair. Jezebel was chasing him, and he longed for death. At the mountain on Horeb in a cave, Elijah met the Lord.

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Be filled with hopeful anticipation of an eternity with God

Bishop Robert J. Hermann

With the start of Advent on Nov. 29 beginning a new liturgical year, the Church has us focus on where we are headed.

With this focus, we can take one of two attitudes. We can be filled with dread as we think of what is coming, or we can be filled with joy in anticipation of what is ahead.

To use a concrete illustration: If we engage in our daily tasks always focusing on not getting fired from our jobs, we won't develop a good relationship with our employer. We'll work in constant fear of being fired. He's the bad guy we have to avoid displeasing.

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