students

Students from De Smet draw inspiration from the people they serve in Puerto Rico

Joseph Baxendale of De Smet Jesuit High School cleaned water remaining in a home in Punta Santiago, Puerto Rico, on a service trip to the island territory devastated by Hurricanes Irma and Maria more than two months ago.

On the Saturday after Thanksgiving, eight students and two faculty from De Smet Jesuit High School arrived in San Juan, Puerto Rico, for a one-week service trip looking like "a great American gang walking in and everyone knew that we meant business," as senior Hunter Schoenig described it.

Students’ winning artwork captures Christmas joy

Elise McIntyre and Molly Arft both had their artwork chosen for the Missionary Childhood Association annual Christmas Artwork Contest.

Christmas joy is captured in the artwork of two Catholic school students from the archdiocese chosen as national winners in the Missionary Childhood Association Christmas Artwork Contest.

A winning submission from Molly Arft, a fourth-grader at Holy Infant School in Ballwin, depicts an angel singing with a sleeping, smiling baby Jesus in front of her. The other winning entry, from Elise McIntyre, a second-grader at St. Justin Martyr School in Sunset Hills, shows Mary holding baby Jesus, both with big smiles and bright eyes. Two big, bright stars shine in the background.

“The Celts” land with the Pioneers

Senior, Tyree Galtney transferred to Duchesne High School in St. Charles after their former school, John F. Kennedy High school closed. He chatted with friends before English class began.

The first home football game dispelled any lingering doubt about Duchesne High School's commitment to its newest students — the transfers from John F. Kennedy Catholic High School, which closed in May.

Kennedy Catholic's old mascot, "The Celt," joined the Pioneer mascot at the game vs. St. Charles High, much to the delight of former JFK students and their new cohorts.

Catholic school students bank on Fed experience

The interns: Rachel Porter, Ted Washington, Clare Berns, Daniella Duban

Rachel Porter served as a board member for a major St. Louis institution before she turned 18.

Last school year, Porter was a member of the student board at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, where she learned about the bank's role in promoting the health and stability of the economy in the United States.

The 2017 Rosati-Kain High School graduate now has a paid internship at the Fed, working in the Information Technology Services department. The experiences have helped her see the bigger picture of how the economy and finances work.

‘Men for Christ’

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As the sun set on the second day of Kenrick-Glennon Days on June 6, Archbishop Robert J. Carlson mingled with seminary alumni priests who had come to support the seminarians, counselors and campers at the annual summer camp.

It had been a good day. The boys opened the day with morning prayer, participated in fun-filled activities — including baptism practice — before and after mid-day Mass, then competed in evening Water Olympics, the culmination of fun times at camp.

SLU administrator helps fight med students’ depression

Dr. Stuart Slavin, associate dean of curriculum for the SLU School of Medicine, is tackling the problem of far too many students in medical school who become burned out, anxious and depressed. He is developing a national following for his efforts, with publication in various medical/education journals, and is partly responsible for changes implemented at the SLU Med School. He talked with his students after they took an pharmacology exam.

When Dr. Stuart Slavin started his administrative duties at the St. Louis University Medical School, the mental health of medical students was not one of his concerns.

About nine years ago Slavin, the associate dean of curriculum, came across material about a problem of depression and anxiety among med students. He almost dismissed it, thinking that the problem didn't exist at SLU. "They seemed happy," Slavin said of his students. "I knew some students were suffering because medical school is demanding, but overall I thought our students were doing well."

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