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Little Sisters of the Poor still need help from the community

Although the Little Sisters of the Poor announced last year they would withdraw from ministry at their St. Louis Residence, they are still serving the needy elderly there and need assistance. Sister Joseph Maureen Hobin, LSP, joked with 99-year-old resident Thelma McCafferty before a Mardi Gras party. McCafferty was born and raised just a few blocks from the sisters’ St. Louis Residence.

The Little Sisters of the Poor have a clear and simple message to share with the St. Louis community: They're still here and they still need your help.

In August, the sisters announced a plan to withdraw from their ministry in St. Louis after 147 years. They cited an aging community and decrease in sufficient vocations to effectively staff their residence for the needy elderly in north St. Louis.

Nuns are cool

The tweet asks: Got nuns?

The answer in this town is a resounding, "Yes."

Where would we be without them? There's no denying their important role in building the Archdiocese of St. Louis.

Strong-hearted, pioneering religious sisters came from Europe in the 19th century to lay the foundation for Catholic education, health care, social services and more. Then, smart and savvy religious sisters built on that foundation in the 20th century, bringing education to the masses and delivering quality health care while still ministering to the poor and downtrodden on society's fringes.

CCVI congregational leader reflects on diversity, charism

Sister Teresa Maya, congregational leader of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word, visited Incarnate Word Academy during Mission Week. Her first stop at the school was to mingle through the Mission Carnival, an event which will raise money for the Down Syndrome Association of St Louis. Sister Tere gave her best attempt at the ball toss booth while students gathered around her.

Sister Teresa Maya of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word remembers watching the news in Ferguson unfold from the sisters' motherhouse in San Antonio, Texas, and wondered — worried, actually — how her community could make a difference.

One of the sisters' ministries, Incarnate Word Academy, is in the tiny village of Bel-Nor, about 10 minutes from Ferguson. The all-girls Catholic high school has been present there since 1932.

On a Journey of hope and faith

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When Marie Uwamahoro was 7, her family fled the civil war in the Central African Republic.

She loved her former home, but being so young, the adjustment to life in the United States was easier than it was for her parents. Now a sophomore at Notre Dame High School in Lemay, Marie likes the opportunities St. Louis offers and the diversity of the city. She's planning to attend college, perhaps becoming a nurse.

Fathers’ Support Center comes full circle with added Mothers’ Project

Thomascina (Ann) Stringfellow, left, worked with Brandy Logan, right, during a Parenting in Partnership class, designed to help single mothers improve their parenting skills, at the Fathers’ Support Center St. Louis Dec. 6. The organization recently received a $319,000 grant from Mission & Ministry, Inc., an entity of the Daughters of Charity Province of St. Louise, to fund the program for three years.

At the start of class, Thomascina (Ann) Stringfellow handed out bundles of cash to her students. Three hundred dollars each, to be exact. Not the real stuff, of course, just play money.

Stringfellow wasn't auctioning cars or household items, though. The women in class at the Fathers' Support Center were bidding on values. As in, the things important to them and what they're instilling in their children's lives.

New head ball rule in CYC soccer a safety-first approach

Fourth-grader Jayden McGrath, right, of St. Paul Parish in Fenton battled Owen Scott of St. Peter Parish in Kirkwood for the ball in a CYC soccer game Nov. 5 in Kirkwood Park. The CYC sports program instituted new rules prohibiting headers for youth players in its league in an effort to reduce concussions and potential brain damage in soccer players.

The Catholic Youth Apostolate's CYC Sports soccer program reports a smooth transition during the first year of its new rule prohibiting head balls by players in fourth grade and below.

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