special needs

Editorial | Another way to show respect for life

Respect for life takes many forms, as shown in an article in the Review this week. Rose Gronemeyer, a special education teacher at Sacred Heart School in Florissant for nearly four decades, and several friends opened the Village of the Blue Rose in 2000 to provide a safe, nurturing environment for young adults with special needs — a place where after their education they could live, work and — most of all — grow in body, mind and spirit.

Village of the Blue Rose nurtures young adults with special needs

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Tom Friedel wears many hats, but he doesn't mind at all.

The 37-year-old is a restaurant waiter and occasionally helps with cooking duties in the kitchen. He also runs the cash register at an antiques store and flea market.

Communities come together to help give back to ACTION group

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The members of Achieving Christ Together In Our Neighborhood know what community and serving is all about.

The group -- better known as ACTION -- is composed of people with special needs from the Northeast Deanery of the archdiocese. Members range in age from young adulthood to people in their 60s.

EDITORIAL | Disability ministry starts with each of us

Achieving Christ Together In Our Neighborhood -- better known as ACTION -- is a group of people with special needs from the Northeast Deanery of the archdiocese.

Michelle Ritter, parish nurse at St. Ferdinand Parish in Florissant, and Father Joseph Post founded the group to support people with special needs and their families, a need they saw within the Catholic Church. They formed ACTION with the goal of making Church communities more inclusive and with hopes to "break down the barriers" that separate people with special needs from people without special needs.

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