solidarity

Archdiocese, others reach out with welcoming, loving hands

Several Catholic ministries in the Archdiocese of St. Louis are organizing a "Solidarity Walk and Mass With Our Immigrant and Refugee Brothers and Sisters" on Saturday, April 8, from St. Louis University to the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis.

Participants will assemble at noon at the Clock Tower on the SLU campus for an opening prayer. They then will embark on a prayerful procession west on Lindell Boulevard to the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis, Lindell Boulevard and Newstead Avenue, for a multilingual Mass at 1:30 p.m.

Editorial | Sign of solidarity

In a new pastoral reflection, the U.S. bishops are once again calling on Catholics "to accompany migrants and refugees who seek a better life in the United States."

The document, "Living as a People of God in Unsettled Times," was released March 22 by the bishops' Administrative Committee. The document, they said, was done "in solidarity with those who have been forced to flee their homes due to violence, conflict or fear in their native lands."

Taizé at Baptist Church in north St. Louis breaks down barriers

A Taizé service was held at New Northside Missionary Baptist Church in north St. Louis. The gathering began with prayer and song. Ramona Neumann, from the archdiocesean Offfice of Ecumenical & Interreligious Affairs, spoke with Regina Franklin, center, and Pat McCarty during a group discussion about trust and fear.

Before Feb. 10, the two Catholics and three Baptists had never met. But after a Taizé service at New Northside Missionary Baptist Church in north St. Louis, they opened up.

When they broke off from the larger group to discuss trust and fear, laughter erupted a couple times as they learned a little about their differences and similarities. Other times they listened closely as each described struggles they've had and how those difficulties led to a stronger faith when they realized God was at their side.

DEAR FATHER | Giving up meat during Lent is a sign of solidarity with one another

Before looking at why we abstain from meat as a common penance, we should examine why we even do penance in the first place.

Canceled Masses become a reason to build interracial ties

Students from Notre Dame University and members of St. Cronan Parish attended Mass Oct. 19 at St. Augustine Catholic Church in north St. Louis. St. Augustine’s pastor, Msgr. Bob Gettinger, concelebrated with Father Gerald Kleba, the pastor of St. Cronan.

Pauline Humphrey, Lamoyne Peal and Eleanor Hickerson stood at the front doors of St. Augustine Church, holding them open for Massgoers and greeting people heartily.

"Welcome. Come on in," was the message they shared Oct. 19.

This Sunday was more crowded than usual at St. Augustine in north St. Louis, thanks to visitors from St. Cronan Parish in Midtown St. Louis where two Sunday Masses were canceled. The predominantly Caucasian congregation was invited to attend Mass at the predominantly African-American church 10 miles away.

BEFORE THE CROSS | Solidarity means working together for the one human family

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson celebrated a Mass for members of the St. Thomas More Society of Greater St. Louis at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Clayton June 22.

According to Blessed John Paul II, solidarity with the human family consists in "a firm and persevering determination to commit oneself to the common good." In pursuit of solidarity, the pope called for a worldwide effort to promote development, an effort that "involves sacrificing the positions of income and of power enjoyed by the more developed economies" in the interest of "an overall human enrichment to the family of nations."

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