Social Justice

Catholic Campaign for Human Development grows success

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Broccoli, beets, turnips, sprouts, spinach, cauliflower and more fill the bins at City Greens Market's bright and colorful storefront on Manchester Avenue in St. Louis.

With a $6,300 grant from the Catholic Campaign for Human Development, several families will grow food to sell at the nonprofit market. Also, herbs locally grown are coveted by restaurants which pay top-dollar.

God is Calling

Thomasina Clarke, left, conducted an audition with Patrice Mari for the play “Growing up Catholic: What’s Race Got To Do With It?” The audition was held at St. Alphonsus Liguori “Rock” Church and the play will be performed Oct. 14 and 15 at St. Louis University.

After the death of Michael Brown in 2014, shot in a confrontation with a police officer, Josh Meister had an awakening.

"The situation opened my eyes to the fact that there's still a lot of racial tension and I didn't really realize it," Meister said.

Fast forward three years to the not guilty verdict of former St. Louis Police Officer Jason Stockley — a white officer charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death in 2011 of Anthony Lamar Smith, a known drug dealer who was black. Meister realized it was time to put his faith into action.

Nation's budget is a 'moral document'; House bill puts poor in 'real jeopardy'

"A nation's budget is a moral document. "Congress should choose a better path, one that honors those struggling in our country." 

—Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Florida, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. House budget resolution "will place millions of poor and vulnerable people in real jeopardy" because it reduces deficits "through cuts for human needs" and by trying to slash taxes at the same time, said the chairman of the U.S. bishops' domestic policy committee.

"A nation's budget is a moral document," said Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Florida, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development. "Congress should choose a better path, one that honors those struggling in our country."

Apartment is just what was needed for St. Patrick Center client

Bryan Pseno’s sparse apartment is a relief from homeless shelters. Pseno secured the apartment through St. Patrick Center’s Housing First approach to rapidly provide permanent housing homeless people. Pseno now volunteers at St. Patrick Center while the agency also assists him with finding employment.

It's a slightly worn, sparsely furnished apartment in south St. Louis, but Bryan Pseno doesn't mind.

It's a long way from sleeping in a homeless shelter.

Pseno came to St. Louis from Chicago with a trailer full of furniture. He lived with his mom and left when she died, deciding to move on with his life and get away from negative influences. With an inheritance, he figured he'd stay at a motel until he got a job. He was unable to get employment, however, and lost his belongings in a storage unit when he couldn't pay the rent.

Event helps ministry close gap after state cuts

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson spoke with people at a recognition dinner hosted by the Criminal Justice Ministry on June 1 at Moulin in St. Louis. Archbishop Carlson accepted the Luminary Award on behalf of the Archdiocese of St. Louis at the event.

The funding gap for the Criminal Justice Ministry caused by a state budget cut is closing, but the ministry still needs financial support to help the agency with its outreach.

Since 1979, the Criminal Justice Ministry has supported and empowered people impacted by incarceration. The agency provides jail and prison ministry, client re-entry services and advocacy for community safety and criminal justice reform.

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