sister mary antona ebo

EDITORIAL | Civil Rights icon Sister Antona Ebo remains an example for us in the fight for justice and equality

Throughout her life, Sister Mary Antona Ebo was known for standing for justice and equality for all.

With her death Nov. 11, there are many who desire to keep her spirit alive. The African-American woman religious, who marched in Selma, Ala., in 1965 for civil rights, told the crowd then that, "I'm here because I'm a Negro, a nun, a Catholic, and because I want to bear witness."

Obituary | Sister Mary Antona Ebo, FSM

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Sister Mary Antona Ebo, a Franciscan Sister of Mary whose courageous words during the March 10, 1965, march in Selma, Ala., became a rallying cry for many in the Civil Rights movement, died Nov. 11 at The Sarah Community in Bridgeton. She was 93 and was a Franciscan Sister of Mary for 71 years.

A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m., Monday, Nov. 20, at St. Alphonsus "Rock" Church, 1118 N. Grand Blvd. in north St. Louis. Visitation will take place at 9 a.m., preceding the Mass. Archbishop Robert J. Carlson will preside at the Mass.

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