sin

DEAR FATHER | Different degrees of sin, but all destroy the love in our hearts

This is a question that many people wonder about. We hear of terms such as "mortal sin," "venial sin," "deadly sins" and so on. But what do they mean?

Sin is a "failure in genuine love for God and neighbor caused by a perverse attachment to certain goods" (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1849). It sets us against God's love, for it declares that the love I have for myself or another person or thing is greater than the love I have for God.

Fear becomes sin when it leads to hostility toward migrants, pope says

Family members brought up the offertory gifts as Pope Francis celebrated Mass marking the World Day of Migrants and Refugees Jan. 14 in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican. The World Day for Migrants and Refugees has been an annual celebration of the Catholic Church for more than 100 years, with St. Pius X beginning the observance in 1914.

VATICAN CITY — Being afraid and concerned about the impact of migration is not a sin, Pope Francis said, but it is a sin to let those fears lead to a refusal to help people in need.

"The sin is to allow these fears to determine our responses, to limit our choices, to compromise respect and generosity, to feed hostility and rejection," the pope said Jan. 14, celebrating Mass for the World Day of Migrants and Refugees.

FRENTE A LA CRUZ | Condenar el pecado, pero amar al pecador

¿Es posible condenar un pecado en los términos más claros posibles, y sin embargo amar a la persona que comete el pecado?

Al señalar el 45º aniversario de la legalización del aborto en los Estados Unidos, es crucial que respondamos esta pregunta correctamente.

La cultura contemporánea quiere decirnos que no podemos hacer ambas cosas: o aceptamos la persona y respaldamos sus acciones, o la odiamos porque no aprobamos su comportamiento.

Lo que dice la cultura contemporánea es que seguir a Jesús es imposible.

BEFORE THE CROSS | Condemn the sin, but love the one who commits it

Is it possible to condemn a sin in the clearest possible terms, and yet love the person who commits the sin?

As we mark the 45th anniversary of the legalization of abortion in the United States, it's crucial that we answer this question correctly.

Contemporary culture wants to tell us that we can't do both: either we accept the person and endorse their actions, or we hate the person because we don't approve their behavior.

But what contemporary culture is saying is that following Jesus is impossible.

Bishops form new body to address ‘sin of racism’ that ‘inflicts’ nation

WASHINGTON — Saying there is an "urgent need" to address "the sin of racism" in the country and find solutions to it, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has established a new Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism and named one of the country's African-American Catholic bishops to chair it.

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, USCCB president, initiated the committee Aug. 23 "to focus on addressing the sin of racism in our society, and even in our Church, and the urgent need to come together as a society to find solutions."

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Jesus heals the blindness we choose when we sin

In the readings for the Fourth Sunday of Lent, God's Word pierces mankind's darkness and reveals a light that will always shine for those who walk in it.

In the first reading, God chooses one of Jesse's sons to be king. While Jesse presents seven sons, God doesn't choose any of them. God tells Samuel, "Not as man sees does God see, because man sees the appearance but the Lord looks into the heart."

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