seminarians

Serra Club night at Cards game is fun but also a pitch for vocations

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There was no mistaking the pitchers on the mound for St. Louis Cardinals players, even though they're part of an organization with plenty of cardinals.

Wearing her full habit as a Carmelite Sister of the Divine Heart of Jesus and wearing his Roman collar with black pants and shirt, Sister Maria Josefa Kreienkamp and Father John Schneier took turns in an honorary "first pitch" ceremony before the baseball Cardinals game at Busch Stadium Sept. 25.

Kenrick-Glennon nears capacity

Kenrick-Glennon seminarians David Halfmann, left, and Tim Markowski joked in the refectory at the seminary. Kenrick-Glennon is almost at capacity, with 132 men filling up all but one of the 133 spots at the seminary.

In his fourth year at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary, David Halfmann has noticed a subtle difference in the first few weeks of the academic year.

There are more seminarians than before.

"Every day I meet three or four more people," said Halfmann, a senior in the Cardinal Glennon College program. "It used to be you'd walk into class and know everybody. Nowadays, I walk into class and don't know half of them. ... I enjoy seeing familiar faces and meeting the new guys."

‘Men for Christ’

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As the sun set on the second day of Kenrick-Glennon Days on June 6, Archbishop Robert J. Carlson mingled with seminary alumni priests who had come to support the seminarians, counselors and campers at the annual summer camp.

It had been a good day. The boys opened the day with morning prayer, participated in fun-filled activities — including baptism practice — before and after mid-day Mass, then competed in evening Water Olympics, the culmination of fun times at camp.

Seminarians serve as “ambassadors for Christ” at Kenrick-Glennon Days

For Theology III seminarian Tony Ritter, Kenrick-Glennon Days marked the first time he viewed priests as regular guys who enjoy sports and have fun, not as mystery men who wear robes or act serious all the time.

Same with seminarians David Halfmann, a senior in the Cardinal Glennon College program, and Patrick Russell, a Theology III classmate of Ritter. In fact, former campers among seminarians, whether in college or theology programs, tell similar stories about seeing priests as normal people for the first time and opening their hearts and minds to discern God's calling.

More than just fried cod | Lenten Fridays offer variety of dinner options beyond the standard fare

Seminarians cook their catch at Ryan Lake in Lent of 1916.

Editor's note: Updated Friday, March 3, at 10 a.m. with clarification on dispensation.

It's late afternoon on a Friday in Lent, and you're famished.

It's almost dinner time, so where do you go and what do you eat to satisfy the Lenten abstinence from meat for dinner?

The first option, of course, is a fish fry at either your parish or another in the Archdiocese of St. Louis. (Check out the St. Louis Review's map of parish fish fries to find one of the many from which to choose.)

Kenrick-Glennon classes to show links of science, theology

Kenrick-Glennon Seminary professor John Finley taught Philosophy of Nature to juniors and pre-theology I students at the seminary.

In some quarters of society, faith and science are considered to be mutually exclusive, akin to oil and water, incompatible with modern life.

One problem with that: It's wrong. The two fit hand in glove.

"Absolutely, they go together," said John Finley, a philosophy professor at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary. "Anything legitimately discovered by science can only help in terms of the overall evangelization effort of our Church ... and our understanding of God's creation.

"Since God is the author of it all, of course, it's going to complement what we learn in theology."

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