seminarian

Seminarians’ player-coach leads by example

Kenrick-Glennon seminarian Josh Deters served as player-coach in the Soals and Goals soccer match against a team of priests and friends. The game is an annual event to encourage vocations fo the priesthood, diaconate and consecrated life.

On the field, Kenrick-Glennon Seminary defender Josh Deters specializes in goal prevention. But like the other players in perhaps the most anticipated annual soccer game in St. Louis, his personal goal involves reaching souls.

Hence, the game of the year — the Souls and Goals Soccer Cup: the K-G Lions vs. the Clergy and Company.

For seminarian, God wrote straight with crooked lines — or headlines

Anthony Federico, a seminarian from the Archdiocese of Hartford, Conn., prayed in the chapel at Theological College in Washington Oct. 25. After getting fired from a job at ESPN because of a poorly-phrased headline, Federico took another job which allowed him to go to Mass daily and discern his call to the priesthood.

WASHINGTON — Anthony Federico is one of three seminarians from the Archdiocese of Hartford, Conn., studying at Theological College in Washington. But he's the only one of them to inadvertently create an internet outcry.

Federico, who is 33 and in the third year of his theologate at Theological College, grew up in Connecticut, a big fan of Major League Baseball's New York Yankees and the National Hockey League's Hartford Whalers.

Faith group helps with purchase of land, plants in Uganda

Map of Uganda

The hard work and intense study at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary is nearly over for Deacon Joe Lugalambi, a native of Uganda who is serving at St. Francis of Assisi Parish in Oakville.

He'll be ordained a priest in August in his home diocese and serve the people there.

Until recently, only a few people knew of some of the hardships that entails. Priests ordained for the Archdiocese of St. Louis have a place to live, a modest salary and benefits such as health care and a retirement plan. Not so for a priest in the Masaka Diocese in Africa where Deacon Lugalambi will serve.

Midshipman answers the call at Kenrick-Glennon

While attending the U.S. Naval Academy last year, current seminarian Andrew Hunt, left, realized that the call to the priesthood was stronger than his desire to stay at the Academy. He credits the Catholic community at the Naval Academy with encouraging his discernment.

With an appointment to the United States Naval Academy, Andrew Hunt seemed to have his plans set for at least the next nine years, maybe more.

He'd spend four years at the academy in Annapolis, Md., then five more as a commissioned officer in the Navy. After that, he'd either become career military, just as his father, John, was for 34 years in the Air Force, or parlay his Naval experience into a rewarding career.

Either way, it seemed that he would fulfill the dreams nurtured by tagging along as a young child with his dad to Scott Air Force Base in Mascoutah, Ill.

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