science

Area girls' high schools promote new careers

Cor Jesu seniors Katie Kurowski, left, Kellie Flynn, center, and Shannon Garrison, right, looked inside the hot-air balloon they constructed as part of the engineering and design applications class at St. Joseph’s Academy High School.

"Things are going too well Mrs. Haddock, something is going to go wrong," Bud Stein said after the successful launch of a hot-air balloon built by students in the engineering and design applications class at St. Joseph's Academy High School.

Bud Stein and Julie Haddock have been teaching this course at St. Joseph's for about 15 years. Both previously worked as civil engineers. The course involves the practical applications of math and science through various projects, such as hot-air balloons, bridge construction and surveying.

Church scientists see no conflict between evolution, hand of God

VATICAN CITY -- Evolutionary science is still grappling with understanding how the human species, with its unique capacities for language, culture, abstract reasoning and spirituality, may have emerged from a pre-ape ancestor.

While the Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches that God "freely created man," the Church still considers the scientific investigation of the origins of humanity to be a valuable contribution to human knowledge.

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