saint

Cause for canonization opened for classmate and friend of Kenrick-Glennon rector

Then-seminarians, from left, Don Kettle, Ragheed Ganni and James Mason visited at the Pontifical Irish College in Rome, circa 1999 or 2000. Father Mason keeps this photo and a holy card of Father Ganni in his breviary.

Iconic imagery of the war in Iraq shows the U.S. Army pulling down the statue of Saddam Hussein in Baghdad's Firdaus Square on April 9, 2003.

While a sledgehammer-wielding man made little headway on the statue base, soldiers rolled up in a tank, wrapped a chain around the statue's neck, covered the face with the U.S. flag and let 'er rip. Hundreds of Iraqis cheered and celebrated their liberation from the brutal dictator.

But not everyone was so moved. In fact, Father Ragheed Aziz Ganni predicted persecution for minority Christians and brethren Chaldean Catholics as a result.

DEAR FATHER | There is a distinction between sainthood and canonization

A helpful distinction needs to be made here. Being a saint isn't reserved exclusively to those whom the Church has declared such. Rather, a saint is anyone who has made it to heaven and now beholds the presence of God. One need not be declared by the Church to receive this honor: only God needs to declare it. So, yes, it's all together likely that there are saints in heaven who weren't Catholic.

But there remains the question of whether the Church could canonize a non-Catholic individual.

‘Truly a treasure’

The Society of the Sacred Heart recently received a 200 year-old ciborium that St. Madeleine Sophie Barat gave to St. Rose Philippine Duchesne to bring to the New World in 1818. The ciborium went to places like Cuba and Venezuela before making its way to St. Louis. Despite St. Rose Philippine Duchesne encountering problems like pirates, the chalice survived and made it to St. Louis.

Two saints, Caribbean pirates and faith-filled Religious of the Sacred Heart.

All three — part of a fantastic journey covering five countries on three continents over two centuries — converged at the Sacred Heart Spirituality Forum recently at St. Louis University, delivering a monumental surprise to the St. Louis-based Province of the United States-Canada.

Young martyr a symbol of hope for Mexico’s priests

A man held an image of St. Jose Sanchez del Rio, who was martyred at the age of 14 in 1928, before the canonization Mass for him and six others, celebrated by Pope Francis in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican Oct. 16. The other saints canonized Oct. 16 were St. Jose Gabriel del Rosario Brochero, St. Jose Sanchez del Rio, St. Salomone Leclerq, St. Elizabeth of the Holy Trinity, St. Manuel Gonzalez Garcia, St. Ludovico Pavoni and St. Alfonso Maria Fusco.

ROME — The heroism of Mexico's newest saint, St. Jose Sanchez del Rio, should embolden the nation's priests to continue their ministry with trust in God, said the vice postulator of the young saint's cause.

For priests in Mexico, especially those who denounce the activity of drug traffickers and find themselves targeted for attacks, the life of St. Jose is a call to place their "full trust in God," Antonio Berumen, the vice postulator, said.

St. Teresa of Kolkata will always be 'Mother' Teresa, pope says

Pope Francis kissed a prayer card presented by a Missionaries of Charity nun at the conclusion of the canonization Mass of St. Teresa of Kolkata in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Sept. 4

VATICAN CITY -- With a large tapestry bearing the portrait of the woman known as the "Saint of the Gutters" suspended above him, Pope Francis proclaimed the sainthood of Mother Teresa of Kolkata, hailing her courage and love for the poor.

Despite the formality of the occasion though, "her sanctity is so close to us, so tender and fruitful, that spontaneously we will continue to call her 'Mother Teresa,'" Pope Francis said to applause at the canonization Mass Sept. 4.

Anne-Thérèse Guérin, a woman of courage, perseverance and deep faith

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson exchanged a sign of peace with Rev. Dr. Roy C. Moore from the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America during an ecumenical prayer service Jan. 22 at All Saints Church in University City. “What does God require of Us?” was the theme for the annual Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. Behind the archbishop on the left was Archimandrite Theophan Koja of St. Thomas the Apostle Church, of the the Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America. Behind the archbishop was Msgr. Michael Witt, pastor of All Saints Parish.

For the past several weeks, I have been writing about women whose courage, perseverance and deep faith helped build the Church in the United States. These American saints were educators, evangelists, pioneer leaders and women of prayer. They were undaunted by illness, physical obstacles, prejudice, poverty or petty jealousy. They discerned God's will in their lives and then refused to let anything get in the way of carrying out the mission entrusted to them by Christ.

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