refugee

Editorial | Sign of solidarity

In a new pastoral reflection, the U.S. bishops are once again calling on Catholics "to accompany migrants and refugees who seek a better life in the United States."

The document, "Living as a People of God in Unsettled Times," was released March 22 by the bishops' Administrative Committee. The document, they said, was done "in solidarity with those who have been forced to flee their homes due to violence, conflict or fear in their native lands."

Bishop Vasquez welcomes federal appeals court ruling on refugee ban

Syrian refugee Baraa Haj Khalaf greeted her mother, Fattoum Haj Khalaf, Feb. 7 at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago.

WASHINGTON — The chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Migration welcomed a federal appeals court ruling that upheld a temporary restraining order against President Donald Trump's travel ban on refugees from seven predominantly Muslim countries that also temporarily suspended the country's refugee resettlement program.

"We respect the rule of law and the American judicial process. We remain steadfast in our commitment to resettling refugees and all those fleeing persecution," Bishop Joe S. Vasquez of Austin, Texas, wrote in a statement Feb. 10.

English lessons, friendship provided for women isolated in a new land

As she readied to dish out a bowl of soup, Hayat Bashir-Louise told Becky Mueller about the lentils she prepared for the fast of Jonah (fast of Nineveh). The practice of fasting for three days began in the Syrian Orthodox Church and commemorates the time the prophet Jonah spent in the belly of the whale in Scriptures.

Hayat Bashir-Louise was pleased that she had understood the reading comprehension workbook story about a man, Bob Finn, who visited a doctor at the Hill Street medical clinic.

Refugee fled Iraq in fear; now thriving in St. Louis

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Nadya Kanim was a child when her family was forced to leave Kuwait. Her father had worked in Kuwait for 30 years and returned to his native Iraq because of the political differences between the countries that erupted in the 1990-91 Gulf War.

They resettled in his homeland, and all was well.

Then, on a warm summer night in 1996, soldiers rushed into their home and took her father away.

"We were screaming, crying, pleading with them to leave our father and not to hurt him," said Kanim, who was 15 at the time.

Refugee fled Iraq in fear; now thriving in St. Louis

Image

Nadya Kanim was a child when her family was forced to leave Kuwait. Her father had worked in Kuwait for 30 years and returned to his native Iraq because of the political differences between the countries that erupted in the 1990-91 Gulf War.

They resettled in his homeland, and all was well.

Then, on a warm summer night in 1996, soldiers rushed into their home and took her father away.

"We were screaming, crying, pleading with them to leave our father and not to hurt him," said Kanim, who was 15 at the time.

Refugee deaths at sea reach all-time high, U.N. agency reports

ROME — The number of migrants and refugees who have died while making the treacherous journey across the Mediterranean is expected to reach an all-time high in 2016, according to the U.N. Refugee Agency said.

The 3,740 lives lost so far in 2016 "is the worst we have seen," William Spindler, agency spokesman, said Oct. 25 at a press briefing in Geneva. For all of 2015, the agency said, 3,771 refugees lost their lives on the sea.

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