racism

Editorial | It’s time to get uncomfortable

Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, Ill., wrote in a World Day of Peace reflection in 2015 about his hope that families, parishioners, neighbors and others will engage in fruitful conversations about encounters between white police officers and young men of color and about related issues.

Raw emotions, continued dialog part of bridging racial divide

Listening as women expressed pain, anger and frustration in "Mother 2 Mother: A Conversation with Black Mothers" required a follow-up at several parishes that participated in the conversation at Mary Mother of the Church Parish in south St. Louis County.

Mother 2 Mother conversation opens up raw reality of race issues

Sitting in the sanctuary of Mary Mother of the Church, the women opened their hearts and let their pain, anger and frustration pour out.

The women were black. Their audience was largely white. As they shared their stories of raising their sons and having "the talk," it was apparent that two worlds had collided right there in church.

At archdiocesan ‘teach-in,’ high school students lean in to discuss race, culture

Lisa Johnston | lisajohnston@archstl.org | Twitter: @aeternusphoto

Students at Catholic high schools in the archdiocese came together March 2 for a “Culture and Race Teach-in.” Participants spent the day in dialogue listening to different perspectives. Marissa Jones listened to conversation in her group.

Prior to showing up at the Cardinal Rigali Center last week, students were instructed not to wear anything that would identify what high school they attend.

As any lifelong St. Louisan knows, the mere mention of high school affixes a preconceived understanding to a person — call it a prejudice, if you will. And labeling was one thing organizers of the Culture and Race Teach-In did not want students to bring to the table that day.

Archbishop calls for bishops' racism statement given election tension

Atlanta Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory, center, and other prelates applauded Nov. 14 after an address by Archbishop Christophe Pierre, apostolic nuncio to the United States, during the annual fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore.

BALTIMORE -- Earlier this year, as communities faced tensions, protests and violence, following a spate of shooting and killings of black men by police, Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz, of Louisville, Ky., as president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, asked dioceses across the country to observe a day of prayer for peace.

He also wanted the bishops to look for ways they could help the suffering communities, as well as police affected by the incidents.

Day of prayer aims to begin restoring peace to U.S. communities

Deacon Willard Witherspoon, front, Archbishop William E. Lori, Bishop Denis J. Madden and community activist Ray Kelly, lead the Prayer Walk for Peace along N. Carey St., in West Baltimore Sept. 9.

WASHINGTON — Prayers for peace at Catholic schools and parishes around the country Sept. 9 are meant to "build relationships and plant seeds in people's minds and hearts" said Bishop Shelton J. Fabre of Houma-Thibodaux, Louisiana.

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