racism

Bishops form new body to address ‘sin of racism’ that ‘inflicts’ nation

WASHINGTON — Saying there is an "urgent need" to address "the sin of racism" in the country and find solutions to it, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has established a new Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism and named one of the country's African-American Catholic bishops to chair it.

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, USCCB president, initiated the committee Aug. 23 "to focus on addressing the sin of racism in our society, and even in our Church, and the urgent need to come together as a society to find solutions."

Bishops form new body to address 'sin of racism' that 'inflicts' nation

WASHINGTON -- Saying there is an "urgent need" to address "the sin of racism" in the country and find solutions to it, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has established a new Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism and named one of the country's African-American Catholic bishops to chair it.

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, USCCB president, initiated the committee Aug. 23 "to focus on addressing the sin of racism in our society, and even in our church, and the urgent need to come together as a society to find solutions."

Bishops call for stand 'against the evil of racism, white supremacy and neo-Nazism'

White nationalists clashed with counter-protesters at a rally in Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 12. "Only the light of Christ can quench the torches of hatred and violence. Let us pray for peace," stated Bishop Francis X. DiLorenzo of Richmond, Va., the diocese in which Charlottesville is located.

WASHINGTON — In the aftermath of a chaos- and hate-filled weekend in Virginia, Catholic bishops and groups throughout the nation called for peace after three people died and several others were injured following clashes between pacifists, protesters and white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, Aug. 11 and 12.

Photographer uses positive lens

Captain Norman Mann, right, of St. Louis County police department accompanied protesters Aug. 23, 2014, two weeks after the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The photo is among those in the exhibit “Change the Narrative” at The Good Shepherd Gallery.

The Good Shepherd Gallery has come full circle.

Sister Glynis Mary McMamanon, RGS, specifically chose Ferguson as home for her art ministry as a result of the events surrounding the death of Michael Brown Aug. 9, 2014. Ferguson was in need of good news and what better way than art to sooth the community. The gallery opened in November 2015.

Editorial | It’s time to get uncomfortable

Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, Ill., wrote in a World Day of Peace reflection in 2015 about his hope that families, parishioners, neighbors and others will engage in fruitful conversations about encounters between white police officers and young men of color and about related issues.

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