racism

At archdiocesan ‘teach-in,’ high school students lean in to discuss race, culture

Lisa Johnston | lisajohnston@archstl.org | Twitter: @aeternusphoto

Students at Catholic high schools in the archdiocese came together March 2 for a “Culture and Race Teach-in.” Participants spent the day in dialogue listening to different perspectives. Marissa Jones listened to conversation in her group.

Prior to showing up at the Cardinal Rigali Center last week, students were instructed not to wear anything that would identify what high school they attend.

As any lifelong St. Louisan knows, the mere mention of high school affixes a preconceived understanding to a person — call it a prejudice, if you will. And labeling was one thing organizers of the Culture and Race Teach-In did not want students to bring to the table that day.

Archbishop calls for bishops' racism statement given election tension

Atlanta Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory, center, and other prelates applauded Nov. 14 after an address by Archbishop Christophe Pierre, apostolic nuncio to the United States, during the annual fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore.

BALTIMORE -- Earlier this year, as communities faced tensions, protests and violence, following a spate of shooting and killings of black men by police, Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz, of Louisville, Ky., as president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, asked dioceses across the country to observe a day of prayer for peace.

He also wanted the bishops to look for ways they could help the suffering communities, as well as police affected by the incidents.

Day of prayer aims to begin restoring peace to U.S. communities

Deacon Willard Witherspoon, front, Archbishop William E. Lori, Bishop Denis J. Madden and community activist Ray Kelly, lead the Prayer Walk for Peace along N. Carey St., in West Baltimore Sept. 9.

WASHINGTON — Prayers for peace at Catholic schools and parishes around the country Sept. 9 are meant to "build relationships and plant seeds in people's minds and hearts" said Bishop Shelton J. Fabre of Houma-Thibodaux, Louisiana.

Speaker reflects on racial wealth disparities

After police officer-involved shootings and deaths, in Ferguson locally and elsewhere nationally, policing and the judicial system have been under heavy scrutiny.

Young black men, either armed or unarmed, have died in these high-profile cases, raising questions about potential racial profiling by police and about municipal courts using fines from traffic and other minor offenses to finance small-town or small-city governments.

Editorial | Dialogue on race remains essential

The civil rights era was an important time in the history of our country. Priests, religious sisters and brothers and lay Catholic faithful were involved in the struggle. We're proud of the legacy of the participation of the Catholic Church and Catholics during such historic and challenging times.

Some key points from USCCB General Assembly statement on racism

Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, released a statement Sept. 9, 2014, on the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act addressing the importance of working against racism. Some of the points he makes are:

• We honor the many civic, business, and religious leaders, students, laborers, educators and all others of good will who courageously stood up for racial justice against bigotry, violence, ignorance, and fear. We are especially grateful for the vital contributions of the faith community during this period.

Syndicate content