racial divide

Raw emotions, continued dialog part of bridging racial divide

Listening as women expressed pain, anger and frustration in "Mother 2 Mother: A Conversation with Black Mothers" required a follow-up at several parishes that participated in the conversation at Mary Mother of the Church Parish in south St. Louis County.

Mother 2 Mother conversation opens up raw reality of race issues

Sitting in the sanctuary of Mary Mother of the Church, the women opened their hearts and let their pain, anger and frustration pour out.

The women were black. Their audience was largely white. As they shared their stories of raising their sons and having "the talk," it was apparent that two worlds had collided right there in church.

Speaker reflects on racial wealth disparities

After police officer-involved shootings and deaths, in Ferguson locally and elsewhere nationally, policing and the judicial system have been under heavy scrutiny.

Young black men, either armed or unarmed, have died in these high-profile cases, raising questions about potential racial profiling by police and about municipal courts using fines from traffic and other minor offenses to finance small-town or small-city governments.

Reflection on U.S. 'racial divide' is personal for Bishop Braxton

Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, Ill., delivered the homily at the opening Mass at the National Black Catholic Congress XI in 2012 in Indianapolis.

BELLEVILLE, Ill. -- In a 19-page reflection on the "racial divide" in the United States, Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, who is African-American, said he twice had been the victim of what he considered to be unjust police attitudes.

The episodes "made me very conscious of the fact that simply by being me, I could be the cause of suspicion and concern without doing anything wrong," Bishop Braxton wrote in "The Racial Divide in the United States: A Reflection for the World Day of Peace 2015," issued Jan. 1.

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