race

Editorial | Looking inward

In the past three years, God has given us some pretty big signs.

St. Louis has experienced two major events — the shooting death of Michael Brown by former Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, and the not-guilty verdict of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith.

God is Calling

Thomasina Clarke, left, conducted an audition with Patrice Mari for the play “Growing up Catholic: What’s Race Got To Do With It?” The audition was held at St. Alphonsus Liguori “Rock” Church and the play will be performed Oct. 14 and 15 at St. Louis University.

After the death of Michael Brown in 2014, shot in a confrontation with a police officer, Josh Meister had an awakening.

"The situation opened my eyes to the fact that there's still a lot of racial tension and I didn't really realize it," Meister said.

Fast forward three years to the not guilty verdict of former St. Louis Police Officer Jason Stockley — a white officer charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death in 2011 of Anthony Lamar Smith, a known drug dealer who was black. Meister realized it was time to put his faith into action.

Bishop Braxton calls action to end racism imperative for every American

Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, Ill., addressed students, faculty, and social workers during a “teach-in” on fighting racism held Sept. 21 at The Catholic University of America in Washington.

WASHINGTON — Every person "must do something," whether big or small, to address racism in the United States, Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, Ill., told an audience at The Catholic University of America.

From taking a public stance at a rally to reaching out to a neighbor, racism can be addressed and overturned, the bishop said during a presentation at a Sept. 21 "teach-in" on fighting racism sponsored by the university's National Catholic School of Social Service.

Raw emotions, continued dialog part of bridging racial divide

Listening as women expressed pain, anger and frustration in "Mother 2 Mother: A Conversation with Black Mothers" required a follow-up at several parishes that participated in the conversation at Mary Mother of the Church Parish in south St. Louis County.

Mother 2 Mother conversation opens up raw reality of race issues

Sitting in the sanctuary of Mary Mother of the Church, the women opened their hearts and let their pain, anger and frustration pour out.

The women were black. Their audience was largely white. As they shared their stories of raising their sons and having "the talk," it was apparent that two worlds had collided right there in church.

FAITHFUL FAN | CBC football team tackles a much tougher assignment

Football players at Christian Brothers College High School in St. Louis recently joined the national conversation on prejudice, race relations and social justice.

The topic affects all of us, their coach said, and the players courageously came together to talk about a difficult subject.

The best part was that the players, who represent diverse ethnicities and backgrounds, came away feeling better because they opened up about the topic. They also felt it brought them together, and they put out a message of the need for unity.

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