prison

Fontbonne aids a Criminal Justice Ministry enterprise

Mike Tverdick checked the manual for a surger donated to the Criminal Justice Ministry by the Tacony Corporation. The machine will help the ministry with a program in which clients produce pet products for sale.

After spending three hours with the manual, Mike Tverdick figured out how to operate the surger.

It was no easy feat, but Tverdick, who worked in the Air Force as a mechanic, was up to the task. His efforts will make the work of creating ravel-free seams, tight overlock stitches and decorative edging much easier for a program offered by the Criminal justice Ministry.

SLU initiative at jail removes barriers to success

Joseph Jones, a maintenance technician at the St. Louis Medium Security Institution, stopped by a McDonald's for lunch Nov. 8 to find one of the graduates of the St. Louis University Transformative Justice Initiative working there. He'd heard about her success in being productive and staying sober since being released from the institution.

School suspensions seen as part of ‘pipeline’ to prison

Billy Harris calls himself a homesteader in Normandy where he grows his own food and tends chickens and ducks. Billy Harris grew up in southwest Missouri and was incarcerated for his participation in the beating of a man to death when he was 16. He now lives in Normandy and works as a youth justice advocate after seeing first hand what is known as the school to prison pipeline.

Billy Harris grew up in southwest Missouri and started getting into trouble with the law at age 14, receiving unsupervised probation for providing a license plate to his half-brother after he escaped from jail. Harris said that he didn't learn anything from the encounter with the criminal justice system, and no one seemed to take an interest in his future.

‘Godsend’ to ex-inmates struggles after cut in state funds

Brian Moore, who spent more than three decades in prison, said he felt that no one cared after he was released from prison for the first time, after 10 years. With the help of the Criminal Justice Ministry, he is on the right track in his life. The ministry, what he calls a “godsend,” helped him get an apartment, job and someone to take care of, his dog Ruby.

Brian Moore spent more than three decades in prison. The first time, he was exonerated after going to jail at age 16 and spending 10 years in prison. But with limited education and skills and resentment about his conviction, he said, he felt no one cared whether he succeeded.

Visiting prison, pope says all people need forgiveness, cleansing

Pope Francis blessed a prisoner as he visits the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility in Philadelphia Sept. 27.

PHILADELPHIA -- While pilgrims in Philadelphia put up with a long weekend of lines and security checks at the papal venues, the pope reached out to a group of people whose lives are lines and security checks for years at a time.

Pope Francis spent about an hour at the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility. He entered the gymnasium from behind a blue curtain, walking up on to the small stage and carefully inspecting the large chair the inmates had made for him. He turned, with a big smile across his face, and gave the inmates a sincere Pope Francis thumbs up.

After Pope Francis' visit, Bolivians hope for change

Pope Francis greeted people July 10 as he visited the Palmasola prison in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

SANTA CRUZ, Bolivia -- Ernesto Rossell was born Catholic, went to Catholic schools and was married in the Catholic Church, though he fell away from his faith. But he said seeing the election of Pope Francis, witnessing the pope in person and working on the organization of the papal trip has helped bring him back to his Catholic roots.

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