migration

Encounter with immigrants seen as ‘eye-opening’

Sister Maureen Freeman, CSJ, Maria Yaksic, a translator from La Paz, Bolivia, and Sister Joan Klass, CPPS, held hands during prayer. A Catholic “teach-in” on migration was held at St. John the Baptist Church. The event presented current social justice concerns on the rights of refugees and asylum seekers. It included personal testimonies from immigrants during small group discussions.

Sitting down with an immigrant who has come to America for a better life was eye-opening for Sister Joan Klass.

Sister Joan, who attended a "Catholic Teach-In on Migration: Creating a Culture of Encounter" June 26 with six other Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, said her group was impressed with the immigrants who attended and gave testimony during discussions in a small-group setting. "We really are impressed the immigrants are putting themselves out there," she said. "It added a very special dimension to the evening."

Solidarity walk, Mass focuses on supporting neighbors

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Sylvia McLain and her family take the "loving your neighbor part of Catholicism" seriously, she said while waiting with her husband, their three children and several hundred others for a prayer service to start on the St. Louis University campus April 8.

POPE’S MESSAGE | At audience, pope leads prayers for migrants, trafficking victims

Pope Francis held a booklet with an image of Sudanese St. Josephine Bakhita Feb. 8 at his general audience in Paul VI hall. Marking the feast of St. Bakhita, a former slave, the pope urged Christians to help trafficking victims and migrants.

VATICAN CITY — Marking the feast of St. Josephine Bakhita, a former slave, Pope Francis urged Christians to help victims of human trafficking and migrants, especially the Rohingya people being chased from Myanmar.

For the Catholic Church, St. Bakhita's feast day, Feb. 8, is a day of prayer for victims of trafficking.

Pope Francis asked government officials around the world to "decisively combat this plague" of human trafficking, paying particular attention to trafficking in children. "Every effort must be made to eradicate this shameful and intolerable crime."

Report commissioned by bishops finds diversity abounds in U.S. Church

St. Pius V Church in south St. Louis hosts an annual Migration Mass to celebrate diversity in the Church in St. Louis. A CARA study commissioned by the U.S. bishops showed that the Catholic Church in the United States is very diverse and parishes and ministries need to adapt and prepare for growing diversity.

BALTIMORE — The Catholic Church is one of the most culturally diverse institutions in the United States and Catholic institutions and ministries need to adapt and prepare for growing diversity, said a report presented to the country's bishops Nov. 15.

The report, by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University, was commissioned by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on Cultural Diversity in the Church in 2013 to help identify the size and distribution of ethnic communities in the country.

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