migrants

Baba ghanoush, tabouli, yebra and — welcome!

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Asked to give a review of her meal, Lori Korn gushed in her praise.

The baba ghanoush — a dish of mashed, cooked eggplant — "excellent, very smoky and delicious." The tabouli — parsley, tomato and other ingredients in a cabbage cup — "very, very fresh." And the yebra — meat and rice wrapped in grape leaves — "tender and tasty," said the woman from Boston visiting family in St. Louis.

Caroline Springer, a teacher and co-moderator of the U.N. Women Club at Ursuline Academy, was equally effusive, repeating the word "delicious."

Fear becomes sin when it leads to hostility toward migrants, pope says

Family members brought up the offertory gifts as Pope Francis celebrated Mass marking the World Day of Migrants and Refugees Jan. 14 in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican. The World Day for Migrants and Refugees has been an annual celebration of the Catholic Church for more than 100 years, with St. Pius X beginning the observance in 1914.

VATICAN CITY — Being afraid and concerned about the impact of migration is not a sin, Pope Francis said, but it is a sin to let those fears lead to a refusal to help people in need.

"The sin is to allow these fears to determine our responses, to limit our choices, to compromise respect and generosity, to feed hostility and rejection," the pope said Jan. 14, celebrating Mass for the World Day of Migrants and Refugees.

Ending DACA will lead to ‘humanitarian crisis,’ says L.A. archbishop

Brenda Martinez worries her family will be separated if she is deported due to ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which currently allows her to stay in the United States. She arrived in the United States at the age of 6 and currently lives in Indianapolis, Ind. with her husband and daughters Luna, 4, and Athenea, 5 months, who both are United States citizens.

LOS ANGELES — Congress must separate "the conversation about DACA" from the "larger issues" about U.S. immigration policy, because allowing the program to expire will lead "to a humanitarian crisis," especially in Los Angeles, said Archbishop Jose H. Gomez.

"As a nation, we have a moral and humanitarian obligation to the 'Dreamers.' These young people have done nothing wrong. And their futures hang in the balance of these debates," he wrote in a column. "So, I hope you will join me in urging our leaders in Congress to help them in a spirit of generosity and justice."

St. Joseph’s Academy senior stands in solidarity with ideals of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr

Claire Shackleford, one of the Martin Luther King, Jr. models of justice awardees, is a senior at St. Joseph’s Academy and president of their diversity club. She uses the MLK model as an approach to her efforts to participate in nonviolent ways of speaking out against racial injustice. She talked with students in her club at school including her friend, Kaylen Rice.

Last fall, Claire Shackleford and a few other students and teachers from St. Joseph's Academy left school early and went Downtown to attend the Interfaith Prayer Service for Peace and Solidarity.

Led by Archbishop Robert Carlson, the service at Kiener Plaza was a time to pray for peace and healing in St. Louis following a not-guilty verdict in the trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley, who had been charged with first-degree murder in the death of Anthony Lamar Smith.

MESSAGE FOR WORLD PEACE DAY | Build peace by welcoming migrants, refugee

Pope Francis gave a reflection at a prayer service for peace in South Sudan and Congo Nov. 23 in St. Peter’s Basilica.

VATICAN CITY — Exploiting a fear of migrants and refugees for political gain increases the possibility of violence and discrimination and does nothing to build a culture of peace, Pope Francis stated in his message for World Peace Day 2018.

"Those who, for what may be political reasons, foment fear of migrants instead of building peace are sowing violence, racial discrimination and xenophobia, which are matters of great concern for all those concerned for the safety of every human being," the pope stated in the message, which was released by the Vatican Nov. 24.

Share the Journey campaign urges Catholics to connect with migrants

A Rohingya refugee woman waited for aid with her grandson inside a temporary shelter Sept. 19 at a camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh.

WASHINGTON — A prayer here, a share on social media there, a voice of support in a letter to the editor, even a get-to-know-others potluck.

Supporting refugees and migrants can take many forms, and Pope Francis is hoping Catholics around the world will act over the next two years to encounter people on the move.

In the U.S., the Church's leading organizations have developed a series of activities, including prayers, that families, parishes, schools and individuals can undertake throughout the Share the Journey campaign the pope opened Sept. 27 at the Vatican.

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