Mexico

Church leaders offer prayers, Mexicans pitch in after earthquake

Rescuers searched for survivors in the debris of collapsed buildings Sept. 20 in Mexico City. The magnitude 7.1 earthquake hit Sept. 19 to the southeast of the city, killing hundreds.

MEXICO CITY — Mexican Church leaders offered prayers and urged generosity after an earthquake struck the national capital and its environs, claiming more than 240 lives — including at least 20 children trapped in a collapsed school.

The magnitude 7.1 earthquake Sept. 19 added to the misery of Mexicans who suffered a magnitude 8.1 earthquake 12 days earlier. That quake left nearly 100 dead in the country's southern states and left thousands more homeless.

Encounter with immigrants seen as ‘eye-opening’

Sister Maureen Freeman, CSJ, Maria Yaksic, a translator from La Paz, Bolivia, and Sister Joan Klass, CPPS, held hands during prayer. A Catholic “teach-in” on migration was held at St. John the Baptist Church. The event presented current social justice concerns on the rights of refugees and asylum seekers. It included personal testimonies from immigrants during small group discussions.

Sitting down with an immigrant who has come to America for a better life was eye-opening for Sister Joan Klass.

Sister Joan, who attended a "Catholic Teach-In on Migration: Creating a Culture of Encounter" June 26 with six other Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, said her group was impressed with the immigrants who attended and gave testimony during discussions in a small-group setting. "We really are impressed the immigrants are putting themselves out there," she said. "It added a very special dimension to the evening."

Young martyr a symbol of hope for Mexico’s priests

A man held an image of St. Jose Sanchez del Rio, who was martyred at the age of 14 in 1928, before the canonization Mass for him and six others, celebrated by Pope Francis in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican Oct. 16. The other saints canonized Oct. 16 were St. Jose Gabriel del Rosario Brochero, St. Jose Sanchez del Rio, St. Salomone Leclerq, St. Elizabeth of the Holy Trinity, St. Manuel Gonzalez Garcia, St. Ludovico Pavoni and St. Alfonso Maria Fusco.

ROME — The heroism of Mexico's newest saint, St. Jose Sanchez del Rio, should embolden the nation's priests to continue their ministry with trust in God, said the vice postulator of the young saint's cause.

For priests in Mexico, especially those who denounce the activity of drug traffickers and find themselves targeted for attacks, the life of St. Jose is a call to place their "full trust in God," Antonio Berumen, the vice postulator, said.

Editorial | Pope Francis stresses family life, need to be one Church everywhere

Pope Francis grabbed our attention when he visited the United States in September, and he's done it again with his visit to Mexico.

On Feb. 15 in Tuxlia Gutierrez, Mexico, Pope Francis said family life is not always easy and often is a struggle, but he pleaded for perseverance, saying family life was one of the solutions to increasing isolation and uncertainty and its unintended consequences.

POPE'S VISIT TO MEXICO: In crime-plagued periphery, pope preaches conversion

Pope Francis used incense at a Mass in Ecatepec, Mexico.

ECATEPEC, Mexico — Pope Francis began his travels to Mexico's "peripheries" by visiting an overcrowded, sprawling settlement known internationally as a hunting ground for girls to force into prostitution and for boys to enlist in the drug trade.

Ecatepec, on the northern edge of Mexico City, also has tidy gated communities and a new shopping mall with department stores like Sears, a big WalMart, Starbucks and dozens of other shops and restaurants.

Pope Francis' schedule for visit to Mexico

VATICAN CITY -- Pope Francis will visit some of the most marginalized communities in Mexico and seek to bring hope to a country deeply suffering from crime, corruption and inequality when he visits in February.

The Vatican announced Dec. 12 details about the pope's Feb. 12-17 trip to Mexico, during which he will stop in six cities, including two in the state of Chiapas and -- across from El Paso, Texas -- Ciudad Juarez, which just five years ago was considered the "murder capital of the world" as drug cartels disputed a trafficking corridor.

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