mercy

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Peter teaches us how to embrace Christ’s mercy and resurrected presence

The readings for the Fourth Sunday of Easter vividly describe how the living, resurrected presence of Jesus transforms our lives, which is illustrated by St. Peter in the first reading.

In Peter's speech at Pentecost, the risen Lord's presence pours out of Peter, who had allowed Christ's resurrected presence into his heart, replacing the old and dark side of Peter.

BEFORE THE CROSS | Mercy is a second chance to get the correct response

It seems appropriate, for the week after Divine Mercy Sunday, to reflect on mercy. The readings for the week give us ample opportunity to do so. One of their themes can be summarized very simply: Wrong response!

Nicodemus comes to see Jesus. Jesus talks to him about the need to be born again. Instead of asking what He means by that, Nicodemus tries to figure out how a person can re-enter his mother's womb. Wrong response!

‘Godsend’ to ex-inmates struggles after cut in state funds

Brian Moore, who spent more than three decades in prison, said he felt that no one cared after he was released from prison for the first time, after 10 years. With the help of the Criminal Justice Ministry, he is on the right track in his life. The ministry, what he calls a “godsend,” helped him get an apartment, job and someone to take care of, his dog Ruby.

Brian Moore spent more than three decades in prison. The first time, he was exonerated after going to jail at age 16 and spending 10 years in prison. But with limited education and skills and resentment about his conviction, he said, he felt no one cared whether he succeeded.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Reflections on mercy over, but compassion must live on

Pope Francis touched a rosary at his general audience Nov. 30 in Paul VI hall at the Vatican. The pope concluded a series of catechesis talks on the Works of Mercy by reflecting on burying the dead and praying for the living and the dead.

VATICAN CITY — The Year of Mercy and its series of papal reflections may be over, but compassion and acts of mercy must continue and become a part of everyone's daily lives, Pope Francis said.

"Let us commit ourselves to praying for each other so that the corporal and spiritual works of mercy increasingly become our way of life," he said Nov. 30 at his general audience in the Vatican's Paul VI hall.

Time of mercy: Holy doors close, but mission of mercy continues

A tapestry of St. Teresa of Kolkata was seen on the facade of St. Peter’s Basilica as Pope Francis celebrated her canonization Mass Sept. 4 at the Vatican. St. Teresa’s canonization was a highlight of the Year of Mercy.

VATICAN CITY — The Year of Mercy brought more than 20 million pilgrims to Rome, but for Pope Francis, the idea always was that the celebration of God's mercy would be local: Have people experience God's love in their parishes and send them out into the world to commit random acts of mercy.

Message of mercy continues in example of Christ the King

Pope Francis closed the Holy Door of St. Peter’s Basilica to mark the closing of the jubilee Year of Mercy at the Vatican Nov. 20.

VATICAN CITY — Following Christ the King, whose regal power is love and mercy, means the whole Church and each Christian must "follow his way of tangible love," Pope Francis said.

Celebrating the feast of Christ the King Nov. 20 and officially closing the extraordinary jubilee celebration of the Year of Mercy, Pope Francis declared, "we have received mercy in order to be merciful."

On a warm, late fall morning, St. Peter's Square was filled with an estimated 70,000 people for the Mass, which was concelebrated by the new cardinals Pope Francis had created the previous day.

Syndicate content