mercy

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Jesus grants infinite mercy if we see and serve Him in others

On Nov. 26, we celebrate the Feast of Christ the King. The feast describes our commencement time on earth; the Scriptures vividly describe our future. Each of us, without fail, will be there. For some, it will be a time of receiving a sentence, and for others a diploma or reward — both unending.

Neglected works of mercy: burying, praying for forgotten dead

An angel figurine is seen near a headstone in 2016 at the cemetery at the motherhouse of the Sisters of St. Dominic of Amityville, N.Y.

VATICAN CITY — When a friend's beloved dog died, Adrian Cruz dug a grave, prepared a box, cleaned the dog and helped bury the animal in a way that helped his grieving friend mourn the loss of her pet.

Earlier the same day, Cruz, a Catholic mortician, tried to comfort an acquaintance who was devastated to find out what would happen to a friend who died and whose family was unwilling to give him a proper burial.

BEFORE THE CROSS | Make the pattern of your life one of seeking God’s mercy

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson

What's the pattern of your life?

Every addict in recovery knows the fundamental patterns of thinking, feeling and acting that support their addiction or their recovery.

The Israelites, too, recognized fundamental patterns in their life as God's people.

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | God passionately wants to share His mercy

God is the relentless source of goodness to all who come to Him in hope and humility, an image depicted in the readings for the 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time.

In the first reading, the Lord tells us: "Observe what is right, do what is just; for My salvation is about to come, My justice about to be revealed." Justice and righteousness are divine prerogatives. Man can't justify himself by his works; he can only receive righteousness as a gift from God, who offers the gift of righteousness so that man can experience dialogue and union with God.

POPE’S MESSAGE | ‘Perfect’ Catholics who despise others is sad situation

Pope Francis greeted the crowd at his weekly audience Aug. 9 in Paul VI hall at the Vatican. Continuing his series of audience talks about Christian hope, the pope reflected on Jesus’ “scandalous gesture” of forgiving the sinful woman.

VATICAN CITY — God didn't choose perfect people to form His Church, but rather sinners who have experienced His love and forgiveness, Pope Francis said.

The Gospel of Luke's account of Jesus forgiving the sinful woman shows how His actions went against the general mentality of his time, a "clear separation" between the pure and impure, the pope said Aug. 9 at his weekly general audience.

"There were some scribes, those who believed they were perfect," the pope said. "And I think about so many Catholics who think they are perfect and scorn others. This is sad."

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Witnessing to the world starts with witnessing to God’s mercy

'Nothing is concealed that will not be revealed, nor secret that will not be known.' 

In the Gospel reading for the 12th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Jesus speaks in powerful imperatives, simply telling us that the time has come for the Gospel to explode on the world, and that we're the ones to make this happen.

One translation puts it this way: "What was concealed, must be revealed; what was secret, must be made known; what was said in darkness, must be spoken in light; what was whispered, must be shouted."

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