mass shooting

Do not let hate, violence 'have the last word,' says Las Vegas bishop

People mourned at an interfaith memorial service Oct. 2 in Las Vegas for victims of a shooting spree directed at an outdoor country music festival late Oct. 1. A gunman perched in a room on the 32nd floor of a casino hotel unleashed a shower of bullets on the festival below, killing at least 59 people and wounding more than 500.

LAS VEGAS — At an emotional interfaith prayer service at Guardian Angel Cathedral, Las Vegas Bishop Joseph A. Pepe told those filling the pews Oct. 2 that "in the face of tragedy we need each other."

"And in the face of violence, we stand together because we cannot let hate and violence have the last word," he said in his remarks at the evening service.

"We gather from all faiths and walks of life. We pray and sing and listen to the word of God to remind ourselves that amidst this tragedy, God is with us," Bishop Pepe said. "God cries with our tears."

Editorial | The Church weeps with Orlando

In the aftermath of the horrific mass shooting June 12 at a nightclub in Orlando, Fla., we struggle to make sense of such violence, destruction, hate and suffering.

The events go against everything we uphold as community values. A statement issued by the Vatican on behalf of Pope Francis referred to the Orlando attack as "terrible and absurd violence." It's almost incomprehensible that a country that has had as many mass shootings as the United States is still capable of having its worst one in our lifetimes, in terms of dead and wounded.

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