love

POPE’S MESSAGE | Love is the engine driving hope on life’s bumpy road

Pope Francis passed Mexico’s flag as he greeted the crowd at his general audience April 12 in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican. The pope continued his series on Christian hope in his talk.

VATICAN CITY — The cross, loving service and humble sacrifice are the only way to overcome evil and give hope to the world, Pope Francis said.

Those who love their own lives and always hunger for more are the losers, the pope said at his weekly general audience April 12.

Rather, those who readily serve others and "live God's way" are the winners, who "save themselves and others, becoming seeds of hope for the world," he said.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Even in dark times, never lose hope in God’s love

Pope Francis greeted participants in the Indigenous Peoples’ Forum of the International Fund for Agricultural Development Feb. 15 at the Vatican. Development projects involving indigenous communities must be planned in consultation with them and must respect their traditional relationship to the land, Pope Francis said.

VATICAN CITY — Christians must never lose hope and should remind themselves that God loves them even at their worst, Pope Francis said.

God's love provides "security" both in difficult moments and even when "I have done something terrible and evil," the pope said Feb. 15 at his weekly general audience.

"No one can take this security from us. We must repeat it like a prayer: God loves me. I am sure that God loves me!" he said.

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Devotion to Christ’s passion begets a deep love for Jesus

On Nov. 20, we celebrate the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe. The most powerful image in the universe isn't a national flag or a coin or a monument. The most powerful image in the universe is the crucifix of Jesus Christ, the image of power over the entire created universe.

All three readings for this Sunday give a glimpse of what that power really is. In the first reading, it's the image of King David being anointed to be king over Israel. Up until now he was king of Judah, but now his reign extends to all of God's holy people in the chosen land.

TWENTY SOMETHING | Listening at the keyholes: how to love better and learn more

When two 20-somethings slung a wire across rooftops in Boston, they were hoping to hear each other's voices transmitted across that line. It worked, and they did, but in the process, they also picked up a far more exotic sound: powerful radio waves emitted from the sun.

Alexander Graham Bell was 26 and working in a fifth-floor attic when he spoke those famous words into a mouthpiece: "Mr. Watson, come here, I want to see you."

The message to his assistant was transmitted, Bell wrote in his journal: "To my delight he came and declared that he had heard and understood what I said."

Church leaders hail document’s mercy but caution against hurried reading

WASHINGTON — Pope Francis' apostolic exhortation on love and the family invites the Church to see the daily struggles of families as an opportunity to encounter people the way Jesus encountered people with mercy throughout his life, Catholic observers said.

Because of its length — 256 pages — and the depth to which the pope explores love, marriage and Church teaching on the family, the document deserves to be unpacked with patience and careful discernment for mercy to take root in the Church's response to real human needs, Catholic leaders said.

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Reflect on Jesus’ question to Peter: ‘Do you love me?’

Bishop Robert J. Hermann

Our subconscious is a beautiful part of our being, but all too often we use it as a deposit for painful and unwanted memories. We toss bothersome memories into our unconscious because they make us feel bad.

Perhaps St. Peter's most painful memories were his denials in the courtyard when Jesus was arrested. At the last supper Peter had even boasted, "Even though I should have to die with you, I will not deny you."

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