little sisters of the poor

Supreme Court sends HHS mandate case back to lower courts

Women religious and others demonstrated against the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive mandate March 23 near the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court sent the case back to the lower courts.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme Court May 16 sent the Zubik v. Burwell case, which challenges the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive requirement for employers, back to the lower courts.

The justices' unanimous decision, explained in a nine-page unsigned opinion, was based on the information that both sides submitted a week after oral arguments were heard in the case about how and if contraceptive insurance coverage could be obtained by employees through their insurance companies without directly involving religious employers who object to this coverage.

Letter to the editor

Violated

Alas, we are told that our own government does not believe that a violation of the Little Sisters of the Poor's beliefs is a violation of their religious liberty. Just when we think that the Obama administration could not possibly become any more lost at sea than it already is, we hear this. Never underestimate the danger of those who absolutely refuse to see the light.

Catholics make case against HHS contraception mandate

WASHINGTON — During oral arguments March 23 at the Supreme Court, attorneys on both sides of the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive requirement examined how the mandate either violates or strikes a balance with religious freedom.

Lawyers representing the seven groups of plaintiffs said the federal government's so-called accommodation for religious employers to arrange for a third party to provide contraceptive coverage in health plans was inconsistent because the government already had been able to provide churches an exemption from the requirement.

Supporters show love for Little Sisters of the Poor

A service day at the Little Sisters of the Poor St. Louis Residence included packing Easter eggs with candy. Sister Paul Mary Wilson, LSP, dumped a fresh load of candy onto the table as Breanna Colombini, her 15-month-old daughter Gianna, Katie Sleeman and Kasia Penna filled the eggs.

Katie Sleeman, Breanna Colombini, Rachel Kondro and a half dozen others from Women Speak for Themselves prepared to give Kisses to the elderly residents of the Little Sisters of the Poor Residence in north St. Louis.

Catholics make case against HHS contraception mandate

Little Sisters of the Poor watched news of the Supreme Court case Zubik v. Burell March 23 at their convent in St. Louis

WASHINGTON — During oral arguments March 23 at the Supreme Court, attorneys on both sides of the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive requirement examined how the mandate either violates or strikes a balance with religious freedom.

Lawyers representing the seven groups of plaintiffs said the federal government's so-called accommodation for religious employers to arrange for a third party to provide contraceptive coverage in health plans was inconsistent because the government already had been able to provide churches an exemption from the requirement.

Ultimate relief from mandate may lie beyond the courts, say plaintiffs

 

WASHINGTON — On the eve of the March 23 oral arguments before the Supreme Court in Zubik v. Burwell, best known as the Little Sisters of the Poor case, two plaintiffs appealed the case in the court of public opinion, and hinted that a political solution might be their ultimate redress.

Syndicate content