Life issues

Little Sisters of the Poor still need help from the community

Although the Little Sisters of the Poor announced last year they would withdraw from ministry at their St. Louis Residence, they are still serving the needy elderly there and need assistance. Sister Joseph Maureen Hobin, LSP, joked with 99-year-old resident Thelma McCafferty before a Mardi Gras party. McCafferty was born and raised just a few blocks from the sisters’ St. Louis Residence.

The Little Sisters of the Poor have a clear and simple message to share with the St. Louis community: They're still here and they still need your help.

In August, the sisters announced a plan to withdraw from their ministry in St. Louis after 147 years. They cited an aging community and decrease in sufficient vocations to effectively staff their residence for the needy elderly in north St. Louis.

Editorial | City’s pro-abortion law only strengthens our resolve

The city named in honor of a saint and nicknamed "Rome of the West" is now a so-called "sanctuary" city for the right to choose abortion, the horrific act of killing innocent, unborn babies.

Let that sink in for a moment.

Our proud city, St. Louis ... it's shameful, embarrassing and disgusting.

"This is not what our city should stand for," Archbishop Robert J. Carlson wrote about Board Bill 203.

Missouri legislation seeks to pre-empt city’s ‘abortion sanctuary’ ordinance

Lisa Johnston  |  lisajohnston@archstl.org  |  twitter: @aeternusphoto

Sponsor of House Bill 174, Rep. Tila Hubrecht from Southeast MO, watched as St. Louis City Ward 06 Alderwoman Christine Ingrassia gave testimony opposing the bill. Ingrassia came to the meeting of the House's Children and Families Committee to voice her concern over pregnancy resource centers. 

Missouri legislators considering a bill on free speech rights of alternative-to-abortion agencies turned to discussion on religious liberty and a recent measure passed in St. Louis City, at a hearing this week at the state Capitol.

House Bill 174, sponsored by Rep. Tila Hubrecht (R-Dexter), would protect the rights of alternatives-to-abortion agencies, such as pregnancy resource centers and maternity homes, to freely assemble and engage in religious practices or speech without government interference. The bill was heard Feb. 14 by members of the Children and Families Committee.

Missouri legislators considering a bill on free speech rights of alternative-to-abortion agencies turned to discussion on religious liberty and a recent measure passed in the City of St. Louis. The discussion came at a hearing Feb. 14 at the state Capitol.

Mayor signs reproductive decisions bill opposed by archdiocese

Lisa Johnston  |  lisajohnston@archstl.org  |  twitter: @aeternusphoto

Ward 08 Alderman Stephen Conway voiced his disapproval for Board Bill 203 during discussion at the Board of Aldermen meeting. The St. Louis City Board of Aldermen voted to perfect Board Bill 203. The proposed St. Louis City ordinance was proposed to prohibit discrimination based on a person's reproductive health decisions or pregnancy. The Archdiocese of St. Louis believes the bill would cause religious persecution and discrimination and violates the U.S. Constitution and U.S. Supreme Court precedent, and violates state and federal laws.

Update at 5:20 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 15:

A new law in the City of St. Louis prohibits discrimination based on a person's reproductive decisions or pregnancy.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay signed the bill passed by the St. Louis Board of Aldermen on a 17-10 vote Feb. 10. Several members of the board spoke in opposition, saying it's a solution to a problem that doesn't exist and causes unnecessary divisiveness.

Young women use the power of one to build a culture of life

From left to right: Molly Judd, Rachel Leininger, Tori Long

The stakes are high. The dynamic is changing. These are bold statements about the pro-life movement, but so are the women you're about to meet. Each one of them shows what it's like to take the Power of One — the theme from this year's March for Life — and reframe the discussion on life issues. Can abortion become unthinkable in our lifetime? Can we create a culture that supports life in all of its stages? Here are their stories:

Molly Judd — The power of a woman's voice

Age: 24

Role: Events and programs coordinator, Office of Laity and Family Life; single

Editorial | Life issues intertwined

Human life is sacred. The dignity of the human person is the foundation of a moral vision for society.

But at times, society operates contrary to that foundation.

We continue to see human life under attack through abortion and euthanasia. The value of human life is threatened by embryonic stem-cell research, the death penalty and hybridization — last month scientists announced a successful human/pig chimera: an organism containing cells of two species.

The Church upholds the value of respecting life, from conception to natural death.

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