life issues

Taking the culture of death to court

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson spoke with Frank O'Brien of O'Brien Industrial Holdings, LLC, on the steps of the Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse.

History is repeating itself for Frank O'Brien.

Several years ago, the Catholic business owner filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, challenging a mandate that required most employers to purchase health insurance for their employees, including coverage for contraceptives, sterilizations and abortion-inducing drugs.

Wrongful convictions: From death row to freedom

Reggie Griffin, a Missouri death row exoneree, told the crowd about his story on May 20 at an event at the St. Louis Galleria Lush store. Griffin along with fellow exoneree, Joe Amrine, were both convicted of murders they did not commit and spent years on death row before being exonerated.

Joe Amrine selected the music for his funeral service.

He wasn't sick, nor was he elderly. He was on Missouri's death row awaiting lethal injection.

In November 2001, Missouri Attorney General Jay Nixon asked the Missouri Supreme Court to set an execution date for Amrine and nine other men on death row. The court complied in six cases, but delayed in Amrine's case. By then a groundswell of support built for his exoneration in part because of a documentary, "Unreasonable Doubt: the Joe Amrine Case," by a group of university graduate students.

St. Louis Catholics file lawsuit against St. Louis City abortion ordinance

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Archbishop Robert J. Carlson reiterated that the archdiocese "will not comply" with a St. Louis ordinance that violates religious freedom.

St. Louis archdiocesan elementary schools joined Our Lady's Inn, O'Brien Industrial Holdings LLC and Frank Robert O'Brien in a federal lawsuit filed May 22 by the Thomas More Society. The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri.

Editorial | Another way to show respect for life

Respect for life takes many forms, as shown in an article in the Review this week. Rose Gronemeyer, a special education teacher at Sacred Heart School in Florissant for nearly four decades, and several friends opened the Village of the Blue Rose in 2000 to provide a safe, nurturing environment for young adults with special needs — a place where after their education they could live, work and — most of all — grow in body, mind and spirit.

House OKs legislation to protect alternatives-to-abortion agencies

The Missouri legislature took another step toward protecting alternatives to abortion agencies and pre-empting cities from enacting ordinances that infringe upon the religious liberty rights of individuals and organizations.

The Missouri House on March 30 approved HB174, which acknowledges the rights of alternatives-to-abortion agencies, such as pregnancy resource centers and maternity homes, to freely assemble and engage in religious practices or speech without government interference. The bill is sponsored by Rep. Tila Hubrecht (R-Dexter).

Promote life by protecting, sharing clean water, pope says

A man filled buckets with drinking water at a public filling area Feb. 3 in Aleppo, Syria. Access to clean drinking water is a basic human right and a key component in protecting human life, Pope Francis said Feb. 24 at a meeting with 90 international experts participating in a “Dialogue on Water” at the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

VATICAN CITY — Access to clean drinking water is a basic human right and a key component in protecting human life, Pope Francis said.

"The right to water is essential for the survival of persons and decisive for the future of humanity," the pope said Feb. 24 during a meeting with 90 international experts participating in a "Dialogue on Water" at the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

Looking at all the conflicts around the globe, Pope Francis said, "I ask myself if we are not moving toward a great world war over water."

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