life issues

EDITORIAL | Scaling back regulations can have unintended consequences

It seems that for every generation in the last century, a public health crisis surfaced involving drug abuse. Cocaine, heroin, LSD, marijuana and amphetamines are among the illicit drugs that led to addiction and death by overdose.

Today, the United States is experiencing a new type of dependency involving legal, prescription drugs, particularly opioids.

Missouri Senate to consider pro-life legislation after break

The Missouri Senate is expected to reconvene sometime after the Fourth of July holiday to consider pro-life legislation.

In a special session called by Gov. Eric Greitens, the Senate passed SB 5, which would amend Missouri law to pre-empt local governments from enacting laws that adversely affect legal rights of individuals based on their view of abortion, require abortion clinics to be inspected annually and gives the Missouri attorney general greater authority to enforce Missouri's abortion laws.

Gov. Greitens calls for special session to address life issues

Sister Elsy Chencheril is a Salesian Missionaries of Mary Immaculate who volunteers at Our Lady’s Inn to watch children while their mothers are in classes. A special legislative session called by Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens will, among other items, consider pro-life legislation related to protections for pregnancy resource centers such as Our Lady’s Inn.

Missouri lawmakers convened for a special session June 12 to consider pro-life legislation related to protections for pregnancy resource centers and proposals for health and safety standards in abortion clinics, among other issues.

Taking the culture of death to court

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson spoke with Frank O'Brien of O'Brien Industrial Holdings, LLC, on the steps of the Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse.

History is repeating itself for Frank O'Brien.

Several years ago, the Catholic business owner filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, challenging a mandate that required most employers to purchase health insurance for their employees, including coverage for contraceptives, sterilizations and abortion-inducing drugs.

Wrongful convictions: From death row to freedom

Reggie Griffin, a Missouri death row exoneree, told the crowd about his story on May 20 at an event at the St. Louis Galleria Lush store. Griffin along with fellow exoneree, Joe Amrine, were both convicted of murders they did not commit and spent years on death row before being exonerated.

Joe Amrine selected the music for his funeral service.

He wasn't sick, nor was he elderly. He was on Missouri's death row awaiting lethal injection.

In November 2001, Missouri Attorney General Jay Nixon asked the Missouri Supreme Court to set an execution date for Amrine and nine other men on death row. The court complied in six cases, but delayed in Amrine's case. By then a groundswell of support built for his exoneration in part because of a documentary, "Unreasonable Doubt: the Joe Amrine Case," by a group of university graduate students.

St. Louis Catholics file lawsuit against St. Louis City abortion ordinance

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Archbishop Robert J. Carlson reiterated that the archdiocese "will not comply" with a St. Louis ordinance that violates religious freedom.

St. Louis archdiocesan elementary schools joined Our Lady's Inn, O'Brien Industrial Holdings LLC and Frank Robert O'Brien in a federal lawsuit filed May 22 by the Thomas More Society. The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri.

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